17

QSL cards vary greatly in design and is one of those areas of creativity. Some hams end up with fancy double sided full color cards, spending a lot of $$. But they could be simple as well; just text with the pertinent information on it. Need to have info: Your call sign (on both sides) Your mailing address (so you can receive a reciprocal card) Details ...


11

I never saw a standard in the last 25 years. I usually put something in the comment like 'using repeater xxx'. Where the xxx is the callsign of the repeater.


6

In my opinion, wikipedia is wrong on their definition of SAE, despite their reference in the footnote. In fact, even that reference gives two definitions of SAE. Perhaps their are regional differences which I'm not aware. Since my childhood SAE has always meant "self addressed envelope". You put your own address on an envelope, in the recipient's portion ...


6

A QSL card is a physical card usually the size of a postcard. They are sent to verify a contact known as a QSL. To get various awards like Worked All States or DXCC (worked 100 entities) you need to verfiy the contacts. The main way this used to be done was to take the QSL cards you had received to a "card checker" who would verify them. The card should ...


6

It isn't that commercial activities are unwelcome or unethical, on amateur bands. Rather, it's that they are illegal. The relevant rules in the USA are in §97.1 Basis and purpose: (a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing ...


6

You may also wish to consider electronic QSL sites like eQSL and Logbook of the World. These types of sites allow QSL information to be automatically exchanged between stations. In many cases, they are directly integrated into the ham's logging program. While not as visually appealing as a printed QSL card, these nearly instantaneous electronic QSLs are ...


6

They can be sent to anyone you've had a QSO with, whether it's that DX contact or the person next door. You can send them directly through the mail, or through the outgoing QSL bureau. Generally, you'd want to use the QSL bureau if you are sending out a large batch of cards, to save on postage. You can request a card just by asking when you make the conact, ...


4

I have had good success with a "photo" printer. I made my Word template so that it prints the data at the same time as the background image. The only downside is single sided printing. But the card stock is nice because it easily trims down to size in the paper cutter without much waste. I print an envelope with my normal laser printer. When I activated ...


4

So, the fact that laser printers work so well is that you can directly roll-on the toner – that either requires a very finely tuned linear transport of the paper to be printed on (which is mechanically complex and thus expensive), or, and that's what you find in any paper printer – keeping the paper under the right tension and having another roller opposite ...


3

I'd just add a note indicating the repeater frequency and call sign somewhere on the QSL card you send. My XYL and I like to give ARRL First Contact awards to people we've made their first contact with. Many times they're local people we know, so we just have the printed certificate sent to us. Then we give it to the person at our next encounter.


3

As with many purely ethical questions, there is no canonical answer. In the US, as far as my reading of the rules go, sponsorship is not illegal. Most of the code of conduct type things I have seen (e.g., DX Code of Conduct) are also silent on the issue. QSL cards are ancillary to the radio hobby and basically outside the purview of the rules. The rules ...


3

Regarding your question about whether it matters if the RS numbers in a QSL card you received match the numbers in your log, that's mainly up to you, unless you want to use the contact for something, like for DXCC credit or as part of a contest entry. Most contest rules require that for you to get credit for the contact, you must correctly copy everything ...


3

Forgive me if this isn't the case, but isn't just taking a pen and writing the few things that need to be filled out much quicker than printing out labels? Unless you really make lots of qso 's and have a large percentage requesting cards, I would imagine having the cards next to you while doing the qso, and filling them out straight away, would be the least ...


2

These days a majority of DXpeditions and large contest stations print the QSL data on address labels to be stuck on the QSL cards. 10-point type is common, which is about 3.5 mm high, so your plan should be fine. You might want to leave yourself more height in case you write cards by hand, unless you are accustomed to writing neat small letters. The ...


2

The more information the better. A well designed card will give MORE THAN ENOUGH information to properly confim the contact or what was heard. To little information is poor communication at best and WORTHLESS at its worst.


2

There are no rules about SWL cards. Why do we have SWL cards at all? to report reception, signal strength, etc. to the transmitting station to let them know how well they are getting out. to request a QSL card in reply, signifying the SWL has accurately heard the transmission and to thank him/her for the SWL card. An SWL card should give enough data to ...


2

Usually when listening to DX on the bands, a listener will note the DX station as well as the station the DX station is working. Without this information it can be difficult for the DX station to look up their own transmission in their log. For example, the other day I heard a weak station on 17m CW - ET3AA, quite rare, and difficult to work from here (...


2

OK, I think I found an answer to my own question after Mike helped to word the right question :) The eQSL.cc FAQ says: How do I handle SWL cards? When a user sets the SWL/HAM checkbox in his Profile to SWL, it automatically forces all incoming and outgoing cards to say 'Confirming SWL Reception' instead of the usual 'This Confirms Our 2-Way QSO'. If ...


2

"Green stamps" originally meant something else. In this context, it's slang. Since International Reply Coupons are no longer sold or accepted, it could mean postage stamps or money. In some countries it is illegal to possess foreign currency etc., and you'll have to find out whether that is the case in your country.


2

LOTW is a service provide by the American Radio Relay League or ARRL. It started in 2003. it allows a secure upload of your ham radio contacts to an online database. By matching your records with those turned in by the people you contacted the contact can be verified in minutes instead of months or even years which is how long it took with paper QSL cards. ...


1

To add to Jim's answer, one of the goals of Logbook of the World is to be a secure system (reference). This presumably was necessary because contacts with some DXCC entities or other stations are very rare, and such contacts are very sought-after by many people. The American Radio Relay League's rules about certificates follow security practices that are ...


1

I receive SWL QSL cards every few years. And I usually respond, especially if they include an SASE. But why not also respond to eQSLs? In either case, you might make someone's day. :-)


1

I had someone hand me an eyeball QSO card. I think that would be the minimum distance.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible