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4

After looking through things for quite some time, and asking around, I was able to find the following, assuming that I can get a copy of the signed certificate from somewhere. There is some more information at this blog article, and this GitHub site. The log file is done in a format called GAbbI (Global Amateur Interchange). This file format is similar to ...


2

LOTW is a service provide by the American Radio Relay League or ARRL. It started in 2003. it allows a secure upload of your ham radio contacts to an online database. By matching your records with those turned in by the people you contacted the contact can be verified in minutes instead of months or even years which is how long it took with paper QSL cards. ...


1

To add to Jim's answer, one of the goals of Logbook of the World is to be a secure system (reference). This presumably was necessary because contacts with some DXCC entities or other stations are very rare, and such contacts are very sought-after by many people. The American Radio Relay League's rules about certificates follow security practices that are ...


1

I'm not sure you can or should log contacts that were not directly between your stations. Contacts through repeaters, packet reflectors, mesh networks, IRLP, echolink etc. don't really count as a measure of your skill and station. Satellites are an exception though. W2RS says here: QSLs are generally not exchanged for contacts made through repeaters (...


1

I'm one of the TrustedQSL developers. We currently have a C library (tqsllib) that you could link against with JNI, but we don't have a Java port of it and aren't really planning to do one. Most people writing code against LoTW to use the command-line interface to TQSL, explained here: http://www.arrl.org/TrustedQSL/tQSL-help/cmdline.htm If you decide to ...


1

The developer introduction has an overview and links to further resources. If you can link against a C++ library, you can use TrustedQSL to deal with the signing portion, or read the code to understand the process and create a Java version of it.


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