Hot answers tagged

12

Does mixed-mode operation qualify as a QSO? I'd say absolutely, yes. You're making contact with another amateur radio station on a frequency allocated to amateur radio; in my book, that qualifies as an amateur radio contact or QSO. What is the legal status of such a cross-mode QSO? Assuming that your license allows you to transmit on the frequency and ...


11

In general, it is not a bad thing to work stations in a contest and not submit a log. In the big popular contests that don't have difficult exchanges, such as the ARRL DX contest or the CQ WPX contest, the majority of participants are casual. Casual operators are not trying to beat their buddies, or their scores from the year before; they are just there to ...


11

Jim Reisert AD1C regularly publishes various downloadable country files containing an up-to-date list of callsign prefixes with their associated countries, continents, etc. Those files are meant to be used by ham software. Here's three lines from a 2016 cty.dat file. Notice how the fourth column indicates the continent (SA, EU, AF). Guyana: 09: 12: SA: ...


7

It's intended for contest logging. Most contests require that you "exchange" some information. Sometimes it's as simple as an RST signal report and you'd just enter whatever signal report you gave an received, other contests require a serial number (you send "1" to your first contact and increment that by one each time, so that each contact gets a unique ...


4

I've used CQRLOG which is built on MySQL but otherwise has many of the same features as other loggers and is fully customizable. If that's too much and you're looking for a simpler solution, Xlog is a barebones logger that can still interchange data with some of the Linux PSK and other digital mode software. Both support all the popular export formats, ...


4

After looking through things for quite some time, and asking around, I was able to find the following, assuming that I can get a copy of the signed certificate from somewhere. There is some more information at this blog article, and this GitHub site. The log file is done in a format called GAbbI (Global Amateur Interchange). This file format is similar to ...


4

The question doesn't specify that the guest operator is a licensed amateur in the jursdiction in question and/or covered by a reciprocal operating agreement, otherwise we open up the 3rd party comminication bag of snakes. Speaking only for the US rules: There is no requirement that a guest operator logs be kept. However, according to FCC ยง97.103(b): "The ...


4

The ITU is the international body responsible for the allocation of call sign prefixes to each country. You can consult this table of allocations in order to build the necessary logic in your program to determine if the call sign in question meets your award requirements. An example of this table of ITU allocations can be found at: http://www.arrl.org/...


4

Logging is not required by the FCC, but there are several reasons to do it anyway: Keeping a personal record, like a diary, of your activity on the air. You can include other things like weather, equipment conditions, etc. You need a log to submit for most contests. You need a log if you want to exchange QSLs with the other operator, to confirm date, time, ...


4

In the USA there is no longer any legal requirement to keep a log. Many HAMs log HF contacts often for use in contests or applying for various awards. There are a few contests and awards for VHF / UHF so some HAMs will keep a log for these types of contacts, but most don't. You can always use paper logs, there are even small notebooks specifically for ...


3

The FCC no longer requires amateur stations to keep a log. So if you wish to reduce paperwork, a trash can is probably the best piece of equipment to employ. People that keep logs for other reasons (often contesting, or just personal interest) these days often use some software to do it which will automatically populate the time based on the computer's ...


3

[Assuming US Rules] Since the FCC relaxed the rules regarding logging -- that is -- you do not have to maintain a log -- you can choose to develop and use your own practice. I am part of a CW traffic net and I once asked the group how many log the nightly fifteen minute net QSOs. Answer, only one other person besides myself. One other out of about 12 ...


3

In Sweden, there is no requirement that any logs be kept; keeping a station log is purely voluntary, and I know that many don't, particularly for mobile or repeater QSOs. The only really relevant example I can think of is when I was an operator at the SK0TM station at the technical museum in Stockholm; the log book did not indicate the control operator, but ...


2

A simple way to get a Linux logger is to use a windows logger under WINE Windows Program Loader, or something similar. I've done it before and it works fine, however it can cause problems on a slow computer.


2

"As accurate as feasible", I'd say. There are no hard and fast rules. The nice thing about a paper QSL card is you can write anything you want in the box. Can't remember the time? Write "about 19:00". QSO went on for a while? How about "03:15 to 04:09"? If you're recording contacts for a contest or award, the rules may have more ...


2

You can get an inverter that will run a 35W, or even a 65W 120V laptop charger from a 12V source for around $25 at any auto parts store. That won't get you internet, but it will get you all-day operation fairly cheaply.


2

Here in Serbia, logs of a station must be kept for two years. In the case of a club radio station, each operator must sign the log for every use of the station; however the case of a guest using the station doesn't seem to be explicitly defined. The relevant document says the following (translated by me): III.3. Log of an amateur radio station ...


2

The general rule of thumb is to log what you copy. When the sending station submits their log, they should enter what you copied as the "sent" callsign, which should cover you. If you find otherwise in the log-checking report for the contest, you can challenge it. That said, I never enter spurious suffixes like "/QRP" and I have never been penalized for ...


1

For cross-band satellite contacts, the uplink and downlink frequencies, or at least the nominal frequencies of the bands used, should be logged. Typically the frequencies are both stuffed into a "MHz" field, with an up arrow symbol next to the uplink frequency and a down arrow symbol next to the downlink frequency. The name of the satellite ...


1

On HF, or for contest QSOs, most hams keep exact logs with times accurate to the minute, so if you were sending QSL cards for HF or contest contacts, then the polite thing to do would be to be accurate to the minute. Using one's memory for such a log doesn't usually suffice. Where immediate paper or electronic logging can't be used many hams use an audio ...


1

As long as you receive the confirming card, you have what you need as a souvenir or to submit for an award. In my experience, online records need to agree withing 15 minutes to qualify for confirmation, but nothing stops you from correcting an existing record or submitting an additional record once you learn the time logged by the other station. I would also ...


1

I'm neither from Ireland nor involved in legal issues, so please take this answer with a grain of salt. From the document you had linked I would argue that 'frequency band' can be referred to Annex A1.3 table 1 as that states: The frequency bands specified in Table 1 below ... So it's something like: 7100-7200 kHz That corresponds also to my rf ...


1

I built a voltage booster using a LT1270A for this purpose: https://www.qsl.net/ve3lny/booster.html


1

if they say "callsign portable" then it's definitely "callsign/p". The /QRP has no 'real' value "callsign/QRP" is the same as "callsign". In my country (Belgium) according to the law only these suffixes are allowed: /M for a mobile station /MM for a maritime mobile station /P for a portable station /A for a station operating from an other place than the ...


1

Loading a specific profile is quite straight forward and documented in this setting screen: Source: http://forum.log4om.com/viewtopic.php?t=2641#p15009 To configure TQSL to sign with the correct LOTW key, specify a station location for each key: And choose the appropriate location in the LOTW Settings of Log4OM:


1

Ham Radio Deluxe is a popular package for doing what you want to do as for the first part of the question. Actually, QRZ.com can do that too via its web site features -- although I have found that at times it contains errors in the geo-location features. I don't use Ham Radio Deluxe but I have made use of QRZ.com web site via their call sign lookup ...


1

Ham Radio Deluxe's logger can plot contacts on a map or a globe. Regarding the second part of your question, in ham radio when talking about effective transmission area, the term that is generally used is "propagation". Propagation varies quite a bit depending upon the band; propagation on the nighttime HF bands (160m – 40m) is quite different from ...


1

I'm not sure you can or should log contacts that were not directly between your stations. Contacts through repeaters, packet reflectors, mesh networks, IRLP, echolink etc. don't really count as a measure of your skill and station. Satellites are an exception though. W2RS says here: QSLs are generally not exchanged for contacts made through repeaters (...


1

You just confirm them like you do regular contacts (check them and move to archive). The text on regular contacts states, "This confirms our 2-way SSB QSO", so since the text on SWL contacts, it's all good.


1

I'm one of the TrustedQSL developers. We currently have a C library (tqsllib) that you could link against with JNI, but we don't have a Java port of it and aren't really planning to do one. Most people writing code against LoTW to use the command-line interface to TQSL, explained here: http://www.arrl.org/TrustedQSL/tQSL-help/cmdline.htm If you decide to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible