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5

The answers given so far provide good food for thought. I would like to add a slightly different perspective. Today's home is loaded with sources of RFI (radio frequency interference). Routers, computers, wall warts, LED lamps, solar inverters, video cameras, etc. all are potential sources of RFI that interfere with the weak signals of short wave signals ...


5

Good find of all the frequencies and powers, it sounds like you have all the right basic equipment. But sadly for the roadster, you're too late, it's out of range. The video link is designed for a few hundred km, and it's probably half a million km away already. Assuming the batteries on the spacecraft are still OK. It's transmitting 44 dBm. The path loss ...


5

These are data transmissions using OFDM. They are government or military point to point data links. I would expect that the data would be encrypted.


4

There are still many AM shortwave stations. A great way to find out the state of the spectrum for yourself is to use WebSDR sites, which let you use many different receivers around the world from your web browser. Many of them are restricted to the amateur bands only, but some have wider coverage. The University of Twente WebSDR in particular has ...


4

After catching it again today, at 19:30 BST on 5.90mhz I looked it up on shortwaveschedule. It seems to be the lead-in call for Radio Romania International. Mystery solved. The introductory music & beacon can also be heard on this old recorded broadcast from 2011.


3

The simple case would be a 75 foot wire whose far end is an open-end tied to a high support, and whose near end feeds directly to your SDR-dongle. It is assumed the dongle is a single-ended input whose other termination is RF-grounded through your PC. It is likely that your SDR-dongle has a low-impedance antenna input, perhaps 50 ohms. At some frequencies, ...


2

The more information the better. A well designed card will give MORE THAN ENOUGH information to properly confim the contact or what was heard. To little information is poor communication at best and WORTHLESS at its worst.


2

There are no rules about SWL cards. Why do we have SWL cards at all? to report reception, signal strength, etc. to the transmitting station to let them know how well they are getting out. to request a QSL card in reply, signifying the SWL has accurately heard the transmission and to thank him/her for the SWL card. An SWL card should give enough data to ...


2

Usually when listening to DX on the bands, a listener will note the DX station as well as the station the DX station is working. Without this information it can be difficult for the DX station to look up their own transmission in their log. For example, the other day I heard a weak station on 17m CW - ET3AA, quite rare, and difficult to work from here (...


2

To me, a good portable shortwave radio is: Battery Powered with built-in charger. Hand-held with telescoping antenna (removable for external antenna). Speaker plus headphone attachment. Very wide coverage, preferably DC to Daylight (or, 0.15 to 3000+ MHz). Many memory channels for storage. Frequency scanning (programmable) with memory stored bands. Dual-...


2

The batteries are now dead and there is no onboard power source, so we cannot listen to it. See the comments at https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/25010/current-position-of-starman


2

No, not every shortwave radio can receive DRM. A basic shortwave receiver will only support AM, conventional analog shortwave broadcasting. DRM (as well as SSB, another additional mode) are additional features that you should ensure are mentioned on the receiver's feature list before buying.


1

I have an MFJ 9200 CW rig that only transmits in CW on ham freqs, but I can listen on SW broadcast freqs. I always carry it on bikepacking and backpacking trips. I spend over 6 months a year in the outdoors. I rarely actively operate, but I use it every night to listen on SW broadcast bands and just monitoring the convos on the ham bands. I use a 21 foot ...


1

Yes, do experiment, and "toss a length of wire in a tree" is definitely how most SWL's are starting. However if you have a choice, the you should avoid 1/2 wave lengths, or multiples thereof. A good source of information is here http://udel.edu/~mm/ham/randomWire/ And if you scroll down to the little table, you are probably interested in row d or row e. ...


1

We definitely need more information to answer appropriately, but I'm willing to answer as best I can with the information given. The receiver you have chosen is referred to as an Ultralight and is generally regarded as a decent performer. I am not aware of any significant issues although there are always possibilities of "duds" in any receiver line. You say ...


1

The primary factory controlling SW reception is your antenna. Find the antenna antenna input (marked 'FM and SW Antenna') and connect it to a wire of at least 50 feet in length (longer is better); route the wire outside of your house, if possible. Ideally, it should be mounted high up in the air, on poles, to get it away from the earth. The antenna wire ...


1

Chinese-made radios under various brand names have been mentioned. A low-price example is Philips AE3350 which has 12 bands (9 SW, MW, LW, FMmono). While good enough for listening on the broadcast bands this little analog radio has a remarkable defect: the OFF switch doesn't disconnect the batteries (two AA cells)! It took me a while to understand how the ...


1

I was an SWL (Shortwave Listener)/ BCL (Broadcast Listener) before I got my ham license. So I hope I can give you an idea of what might work in your scenario. Shortwave (SW) is from 3MHz to 30MHz. Most shortwave radios focus on these bands. As with any other radio, you want a selective and sensitive radio, but there will always be tradeoffs specially in mass ...


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