15

The full access policy states (my emphasis): No "SWL" (listen-only) access is permitted. EchoLink is a two-way system by design, and there is no mechanism to validate listen-only stations. The last part is key. You can't use the echo link system without being a validated licensed amateur. You logistically can not listen to this system without also ...


12

As Wikipedia puts it: The name of the hobby comes from DX, telegraphic shorthand for "distance" or "distant". There is no objective definition. If it's far enough that it might be a difficult contact, then it can be DX. Of course this all varies based on conditions, equipment, and perception. Sometimes, callers will specify just what kind of DX they are ...


11

In general, it is not a bad thing to work stations in a contest and not submit a log. In the big popular contests that don't have difficult exchanges, such as the ARRL DX contest or the CQ WPX contest, the majority of participants are casual. Casual operators are not trying to beat their buddies, or their scores from the year before; they are just there to ...


10

"Break" is commonly used among amateur radio operators to mean "I am not done speaking yet", such as when talking through a repeater that requires transmission breaks every minute or so. "Over" has a specific meaning in military communications, "I expect a response from you". Amateur operators seem to more-or-less use it in this context also. "Out" has a ...


9

§97.113(a)(4) states: No amateur station shall transmit [...] obscene or indecent words or language These are not the same regulations that prohibit TV stations from broadcasting obscene or indecent content. However, the above language applies specifically to amateur radio in its entirety. To my knowledge, the U.S. Code does not explicitly state what is ...


7

This became clear to me after a bit of time to think, but it wasn't at all clear on initially jumping in. It helps to know the formal definitions of the codes used: CQ is “Calling any station”. The station is asking for (new) contacts from anyone. QRZ? is “Who is calling me”. The station is asking for a calling station to repeat their callsign. Only a ...


5

As said by other answerers, it's typically the station announcing 'I'm ready for more contacts at this time.' It doesn't necessarily have to be a DX station, but any station that is attracting a lot of traffic during contests. It is kind of informal usage, as Kevid Reid mentioned, the official QRZ definition is 'who is calling me?', and CQ means 'calling all ...


5

During contests, a popular station (say DX) has a pileup with lots of stations trying to make contact. A station will often merely say QRZ for picking up someone from the pileup. Thus, in this I am agreeing with the previous answer but with the following comment. I believe that this method of saying QRZ is now so popular in this pileup situation (that is, ...


4

In the US, DX most often refers to a foreign country no matter how far the distance. I live near Seattle Washington and the nearest foreign country is Canada, about 100 miles distant from my QTH. However, DX has some specific definitions created in support of various contests and awards. For example, the DXCC award sponsored by ARRL recognizes a DX ...


4

The answer is very simple: a contest station "running" a frequency calls "QRZ?" because it is faster than calling CQ and giving the call sign. The station running the frequency isn't trying to get only people who have called before to call when he or she sends "QRZ?". The station running the frequency can't call "QRZ?" forever, because soon new stations on ...


3

Ham radio procedures derive from multiple sources, including: the laws that govern the license the NATO phonetic alphabet (which should be identical to what the military uses, but differs from what many local police uses) Q codes which originated from morse code usage; these are used heavily in digital modes, and occasionally in phone modes, and ...


3

QRZ seems to be commonly used to mean “Someone other than the station I just worked, please call” This is the way I always understood it. but while trying to research this answer I found one document claiming that it is appropriate only for “could not copy previous call” and not for “I want someone else from the pileup now” — but I also found a ...


3

Written permission or prohibition to bring ham radio gear on board is proffered by some of the large cruise lines. For example, Carnival gives written permission by way of their published policy where as Norwegian specifically denies permission to possess ham radio equipment on board (or even a satellite phone!). Once on board, the captain of the ship must ...


3

The amateur radio community is largely self regulated. So violations of amateur radio rules are rarely directly directly observed by the FCC. Usually it requires complaints from the amateur radio community for the FCC to initiate action. Typically, for FCC to make a direct observation of a violation, it would have to be a repeat violation, very flagrant, ...


3

FCC obscenity regulations no such thing. It's US Code, and the FCC is only the enforcing organ. So, the FCC themselves say they enforce things on a "we know when we see it" basis, which, for me not coming from a US background, is a pretty strange way of regulating things fairly, since that basically means there's mostly case law, ie. previous decisions to ...


2

It happens slowly and organically. Yes, most of these folks have probably mentioned on bulletin boards, forums, or mailing lists that they have a new project they're working on. They aren't running around putting those notes in all the lists though. They're putting it on lists in which they're active members and in ways they think that community might like, ...


2

As the saying goes, if you build a better mousetrap, then the world will beat a path to your door; but in the modern era, you do need to get the word out first somehow. A website with complete information about your awesome kit is essential. That way, interested hams can find your site either directly from a URL, or from a search engine. Don't neglect the ...


2

This question is correctly marked for "United-States" and I am not familiar with the details of license conditions for that region. I am going to answer this question for "Ireland", to provide for the larger audience. What would be the proper way for him to identify himself, and me as the control operator, during a digital QSO? A supervised operator ...


2

One definition of DX is "anything you have not worked". Someone above said that if you're in Europe then anything outside Europe is considered DX - but that rather depends where you live. If you are on the European side of Istanbul, then the Asian side of Istanbul is certainly not DX. However, even if you were in (say) Italy and you called CQ DX and got an ...


2

So far as I can tell, it's perfectly acceptable to use the Palmer IRLP node, but realize that it might not be connected all the time. It is probably a similar situation to the ISS, you just frequently won't get a response.


1

Break is actually discouraged in the amateur community here. Break indicates you want to break into the conversation, but frequently is too short for people to distinguish who you are which is a problem if multiple people try it at the same time. Instead, just say your call sign. Over might be used in simplex, but most repeaters have courtesy tones, which ...


1

As a repeater owner, people who connect and say nothing are beyond irritating. When you connect, you are announced. Now you won't talk to us? Why did you bother connecting. And now you're going to drop the connection without saying anything? That also is announced. So all these "listen only" users are constantly connecting and disconnecting, ...


1

Overe here, DX is considered to be long distance QSO, arbitrarily, greater that 2000 km. In Europe we consider any station outside Europe to be DX.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible