Hot answers tagged

17

They are legal to use, but only on the amateur bands. (Of course, you'll need to get a license first). There was a lot of debate on whether they were legal, but the FCC finally stated that they were. Thus the older search results you found, such as this one. Since they are not type-accepted, they are not legal to use on other bands such as FRS, GMRS, etc.


17

The ARRL runs a booth at Dayton Hamvention since 2012 where people can submit their HTs to be tested for spectral purity. Over the years 2016-2019, 100% of the Alinco, Icom, Kenwood, and Yaesu HTs they tested were compliant with the standards laid out in Section 97.307. Only 7.5% of the Baofeng HTs they tested were compliant, with 27% being "borderline" (...


15

If I just wanted to pass the test, then judging by some online practice tests, I could get all the way to Extra on my electrical knowledge, common sense, and a bit of luck, but that's not what I want to do! I think that they body of knowledge they are testing may once have been fairly focused, but it has become a bit muddled by attempts to include new ...


12

Fees to obtain a license are set by and payable to the volunteer examiner coordinator. They are typically small to free, and limited by §97.527 to reimbursement "for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in preparing, processing, administering, or coordinating an examination for an amateur operator license." Some VECs and their fees: ARRL: \$15 W5YI: \$14 GLAARG:...


12

There are two different "Title 47"s in play here. Title 47 of the US Code, as referred to by rclocher3, contains laws passed by Congress on the subject of telecommunications. Most interesting for our purposes is Chapter 5, Subchapter 1 which establishes the FCC. It sets the compositon and appointment rules of the FCC, regulates how the FCC can spend money ...


11

Yes, they are. Generally speaking, authentication is legal, obfuscating is not legal. So you could do a cryptographically signed hash that would be legal in the United States to transmit over Amateur Radio. It's worth mentioning that there is some debate as to how legal a cryptographically signed hash would be. I believe it would be legal, so long as it was ...


10

Congratulations! This depends on the folks that gave you your test (Volunteer Examiners, or VEs), the organization they are working with (ARRL?), and the FCC (if you're in the US). A bottleneck anywhere can make it take up to a couple weeks, but likely you'll have a call sign about a week after the VEs submit your paperwork. Your best bet would be to ask ...


10

The ARRL renewals page (http://www.arrl.org/renewals) says: Amateur applications can be filed manually using paper forms or electronically over the Internet. Amateurs may electronically renew their FCC-issued licenses "on line" via the FCC web using FCC ULS . FCC permits on-line renewals at 90 days or less before a license will expire, and when ...


10

FCC 97.113 states that the following is prohibited: (4) Music using a phone emission except as specifically provided elsewhere in this section; communications intended to facilitate a criminal act; messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except as otherwise provided herein; obscene or indecent words or language; or false or ...


9

Here is the link that describes how to update your FCC information. http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?id=amateur&job=cft&page=cft_change_address I do mine on the website and I have not been charged for it. Within a few weeks a new copy of your license with the new address will arrive in the mail. As for not updating in a timely manner, ...


9

Absolutely! FCC Part 15 defines three broad classes of devices: Intentional radadiator. A device that intentionally generates and emits radio frequency energy by radiation or induction. Unintentional radiator. A device that intentionally generates radio frequency energy for use within the device, or that sends radio frequency signals by conduction to ...


9

§97.113(a)(4) states: No amateur station shall transmit [...] obscene or indecent words or language These are not the same regulations that prohibit TV stations from broadcasting obscene or indecent content. However, the above language applies specifically to amateur radio in its entirety. To my knowledge, the U.S. Code does not explicitly state what is ...


9

The FCC issues licenses for a particular service (e.g. broadcast, amateur, land mobile, common carrier, etc.). Each service is regulated by a specific part of the FCC regulations (e.g., Part 97 for Amateur Radio Service). These regulations determine the limitations on a licensees use of spectrum. There may also be license specific limitations. In effect, ...


8

You will have to be assigned a call sign first. To apply for a vanity, you will need an FCC Registration Number (FRN). The rule is that you cannot receive a vanity call sign from a call sign group for which your operator class is not eligible. For example, if you are operator class T (technician), you can only receive call signs from groups C & D. If you ...


7

Is there any sort of familial transfer process that could get that call assigned to me in California? There are 3 types of vanity call sign requests: Primary station preference list Close relative of former holder Former primary station holder For your case you can apply for "Close relative of former holder". Generally, vanity calls can not be assigned ...


7

Back, before the Internet, the documents were published in magazines, conference papers and such – well after the protocols were designed and initial tests were done. In some cases CWID (transmitting callsign using CW every now and then) has been used to make sure the transmissions are well identified even if the actual data is a bit hard to decode. ...


7

Are there any documented cases of the FCC actually tracking down and harassing/fining/jailing people for illegal FRS/GMRS transmissions of this sort? You can browse the Enforcement Bureau's Field Notices at http://transition.fcc.gov/eb/FieldNotices/. I did find a few related to FRS violations, e.g. several cases where a company (or even a township water ...


7

If you are operating under your US callsign, you typically need to abide by both the rules of the country you're operating in, and the US rules. From http://www.arrl.org/us-amateurs-operating-overseas (about CEPT/IARU): "Class 1 licensees... may operate with the same privileges they are authorized in their home country provided that they do not exceed those ...


6

The ARRL has addressed this in detail: Is It Legal? By Brennan Price, N4QX and ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD What Part 97 regulations govern VoIP-assisted Amateur Radio? All of them or none of them, depending on whether you're asking about the "VoIP-assisted" or the "Amateur Radio" part of VoIP-assisted Amateur Radio. Follow this ...


6

Some decades ago, the FCC used to require that US amateurs log every single QSO. And those logging requirements could be somewhat complex, especially for third-party traffic with other countries. It's the law because those 5 channels are shared with other licensed commercial services. If we interfere with those, then the FCC might pay us a personal visit ...


6

Most of the time that I have heard or read that statement: "It would take an act of Congress..." it is usually referring to an impossible or very difficult act. However, the answer is "no" it does not take an act of congress to affect rule making or rules change within the FCC. Straight from the fcc.gov web site we have: Most FCC rules are adopted by a ...


5

There is §97.205, which regulates repeater stations: (e) Ancillary functions of a repeater that are available to users on the input channel are not considered remotely controlled functions of the station. Limiting the use of a repeater to only certain user stations is permissible. So if the net is on a repeater, the repeater's control operator can decide ...


5

Answer the first part of your question: Based on the FCC description of club stations, I think the VE exam answer is referring to a club station license. The description of the club station license from the above source: A club station license allows members of an amateur radio club to have a station operating under a club call sign. The license is granted ...


5

Go to the FCC login page. Enter FRN and password and click submit. Click "My Licenses" on the left. Click on your callsign in the list of licenses. Click "Request Vanity Call Sign" on the right. Note: Steps 3 to 5 may not work unless you already have a callsign.


5

The ARRL itself is not a law firm, but might be able to refer you to an attorney or lawyer with experience in federal communications law and FCC regulations who can appropriately advise you, and even legally represent you if needed. (Interpretation of random posts, web pages, or even published federal bulletins as legally authoritative by people without ...


5

If you submit your application online on a federal workday (Monday to Friday, except holidays), even after hours, it is considered received that day. If you submit it on a weekday or a holiday, it will be considered received on the next federal workday. There is a waiting period of 17 days, during which applications aren't processed. This allows time for ...


5

Better double check. There's no requirement to identify at the beginning of a communication (though it's common practice, and was required at one time), only every ten minutes and at the end of the communication. The "every ten minutes" is often handled (say, on 2 meter or 440 band repeaters, which is where Technician licensees most commonly use voice ...


4

If I just wanted to pass the test, then judging by some online practice tests, I could get all the way to Extra on my electrical knowledge, common sense, and a bit of luck, but that's not what I want to do! That's how I did it. Many of the questions are about electrical engineering, having to do with antennas, feedlines, Ohm's and Joule's laws, Smith charts,...


4

In 2014 it costs $15 (sometimes less) for taking a license test with your ARRL VEC (Volunteer Examiner Committee). See http://www.arrl.org/what-to-bring-to-an-exam-session A license is good for 10 years and renewal directly through the FCC is costless.


4

It's actually your mailing address that gets listed, not your station location, however for most hams they are the same. You can, however, have a P.O. Box listed instead of a physical location, if you want. (See 97.23). As to the security aspect: I really doubt there are a lot of thieves listening on the ham bands for who's got an expensive radio to go ...


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