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13

As Wikipedia puts it: The name of the hobby comes from DX, telegraphic shorthand for "distance" or "distant". There is no objective definition. If it's far enough that it might be a difficult contact, then it can be DX. Of course this all varies based on conditions, equipment, and perception. Sometimes, callers will specify just what kind of DX they are ...


10

This is called operating "split" and it takes a certain amount of skill to work a DX operator working split and even more to operate split. The reason this is done is to help manage the pileup. If too many stations are calling and the pileup becomes unmanageable it takes longer and longer to complete an exchange. This is less fun for everyone. By ...


10

One would usually call CQ DX, but on 2 m FM that would sound a bit odd. Also FM will be heard by many people close by, who will find CQ DX quite funny. You could simply call and explain what you're trying to achieve, some hams would find that interesting and reply. If you find anyone on a calling channel, you could talk about the weather for a bit and then ...


7

We went through quite an extended sunspot minimum before the current sunspot cycle started, and I well remember what it was like. 10m was open only when there was e-skip, which wasn't very often. 15m had openings from time to time, but when it was open typically you'd only hear stations in one direction, like from South America for instance, and they'd be ...


5

That's a lot of questions! Would there be any SNR advantage if each sideband was detected seperately? Would the correlation of the LSB and the USB be usefull because the noise in general is not correlated? Well, that's exactly what envelope detection does: It takes advantage of the fact that the correlated signal energy in the two sidebands doubles the ...


5

In the US, DX most often refers to a foreign country no matter how far the distance. I live near Seattle Washington and the nearest foreign country is Canada, about 100 miles distant from my QTH. However, DX has some specific definitions created in support of various contests and awards. For example, the DXCC award sponsored by ARRL recognizes a DX ...


4

In a word: miserable. I was not active during the last solar minimum, but the one before it was long and full of people complaining about it on USENET, which was still a thing back then. The solar flux index was in the 60s for months at a time, and all you could read in the DX bulletins was how awful things were. However - HF bands seem to open ...


4

Another advantage of the "split" comes from the US Extra test material. The DX station can call CQ on a frequency that may be out-of-band for broadcast for a lower license class (say General/Technician) OR for other countries which may have a slightly different band limit (but who can still listen to the CQ call frequency). And the CQ station can listen on ...


3

One definition of DX is "anything you have not worked". Someone above said that if you're in Europe then anything outside Europe is considered DX - but that rather depends where you live. If you are on the European side of Istanbul, then the Asian side of Istanbul is certainly not DX. However, even if you were in (say) Italy and you called CQ DX and got an ...


3

So far as I can tell, it's perfectly acceptable to use the Palmer IRLP node, but realize that it might not be connected all the time. It is probably a similar situation to the ISS, you just frequently won't get a response.


2

I live in a mountainous area, and when my VHF/UHF FM radio is on, I have it on scan, with the calling frequency in the scan bank of course. Every once in a while I'll hear someone on a mountain peak calling on the 2m calling frequency asking for SOTA (Summits on the Air) contacts, which I'm happy to hand out. So it does happen. If you're on the mountain ...


2

Overe here, DX is considered to be long distance QSO, arbitrarily, greater that 2000 km. In Europe we consider any station outside Europe to be DX.


2

There's not a FM calling frequency for this sort of thing. FM requires good signals, and meteor scatter is very weak and intermittent when it exists at all. The meteor scatter crowd is mostly digital now. Most have all mode (SSB) radios hooked to their computer through some kind of sound card A/D interface and are using the free WSJT software written by ...


2

It all depends on what your expectations are. At the beginning of 2018 We are at or near the solar minimum. Still, you can routinely work lots of stateside stations on 80, 40, and 20 meters with a simple entry level station --say 100 watts and a dipole. Tune across those bands and you will hear lots of signals most days. Nets are active and people are ...


2

Typically during low/no sunspots radio propagation is bad at higher frequencies but excellent at low frequencies. At the bottom of the sunspot cycle the bands are quieter and signals travel farther down at 80 and 160 metres. And if you're a mediumwave DXer this is also a great time to listen.


2

NEC4.2 comparison of an inverted V, center-fed dipole with a linear center-fed dipole: AUTHOR EDITS: The apex angle in my plots here is mislabeled. The correct value is 120°. The graphic below compares the elevation pattern gains at 90° azimuth intervals for these two configurations; posted in response to the comment of rclocher3.


1

I do a lot of off-network travel and one thing I found out is that you can cache Google Maps as described on this link. Then your Google Maps app will keep running as long as you have GPS (and if you don't you likely have bigger problems).


1

To me it is kind of like the word "up". My dipole is up means something totally different than my computer being up. It depends on the context. When hams talk about a DX station, they are normally talking about a DX entity for DXCC award. As such a DX station could be next door if you haven't worked a station within your own DX entity. The other meaning ...


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