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3

The FCC no longer requires amateur stations to keep a log. So if you wish to reduce paperwork, a trash can is probably the best piece of equipment to employ. People that keep logs for other reasons (often contesting, or just personal interest) these days often use some software to do it which will automatically populate the time based on the computer's ...


2

"As accurate as feasible", I'd say. There are no hard and fast rules. The nice thing about a paper QSL card is you can write anything you want in the box. Can't remember the time? Write "about 19:00". QSO went on for a while? How about "03:15 to 04:09"? If you're recording contacts for a contest or award, the rules may have more ...


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For cross-band satellite contacts, the uplink and downlink frequencies, or at least the nominal frequencies of the bands used, should be logged. Typically the frequencies are both stuffed into a "MHz" field, with an up arrow symbol next to the uplink frequency and a down arrow symbol next to the downlink frequency. The name of the satellite ...


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On HF, or for contest QSOs, most hams keep exact logs with times accurate to the minute, so if you were sending QSL cards for HF or contest contacts, then the polite thing to do would be to be accurate to the minute. Using one's memory for such a log doesn't usually suffice. Where immediate paper or electronic logging can't be used many hams use an audio ...


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As long as you receive the confirming card, you have what you need as a souvenir or to submit for an award. In my experience, online records need to agree withing 15 minutes to qualify for confirmation, but nothing stops you from correcting an existing record or submitting an additional record once you learn the time logged by the other station. I would also ...


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