Hot answers tagged

18

The GMRS and FRS bands are governed by the FCC and have specific requirements not just for use and power output, but for equipment that is allowed. One of the requirements is that radios used for GMRS service be part 95 certified and FCC certified for GMRS use: §95.129 Station equipment. Every station in a GMRS system must use transmitters the FCC has ...


17

Your body acts as the ground when using a handheld radio. By holding the radio, you are capacitively coupled to the radio and make the other leg of the antenna. This is one of the reasons to hold the radio in your hand away from your body while using it, rather than using it while attached to a belt clip. (The other reasons pertain to RF safety.) Of course, ...


17

They are legal to use, but only on the amateur bands. (Of course, you'll need to get a license first). There was a lot of debate on whether they were legal, but the FCC finally stated that they were. Thus the older search results you found, such as this one. Since they are not type-accepted, they are not legal to use on other bands such as FRS, GMRS, etc.


17

The ARRL runs a booth at Dayton Hamvention since 2012 where people can submit their HTs to be tested for spectral purity. Over the years 2016-2019, 100% of the Alinco, Icom, Kenwood, and Yaesu HTs they tested were compliant with the standards laid out in Section 97.307. Only 7.5% of the Baofeng HTs they tested were compliant, with 27% being "borderline" (...


15

While for an authoritative answer to this I believe you'd have to ask the manufacturers directly (unless we happen to have someone here on the site who works for one of them), there is a pretty big plausible reason why so few multiband radios include 220 MHz capability. The band is allocated to amateur radio mostly in the United States and Canada. (Source: ...


14

A homemade "rat-tail" ground plane costs 35 cents each to make. A crimp on eyelet to fit your antenna's connector, a string of speaker wire about 19-20 inches long and a little heat shrink tubing to dress it up and done. Soldering the the wire to the connector instead of crimping it will be a better option. Go here for some details about the "Rat-Tail" ...


13

Maybe.... A big project and probably not practical starting out. Would make a conversation piece or odd recycling project. How are you going to point it? Smaller antennas may work just as well. A modern "Dish TV" or "DIREC TV" (R) that is about a foot across is practically useless for amateur radio transmitting and receiving. Below is a stock picture (...


13

There have been a number of good answers already, though I think there are a few additional points worth sharing. Answers would also be more relevant if we knew what situation(s) you were coming up short range wise. For portable use (out in the field): The stock Baofeng rubber duck antenna has been shown to be a poor performer. All of the stock rubber ...


13

220MHz has a long and storied history which leads to the lack of available equipment, and thus low adoption rates in the Amateur Radio community. The short version is that two things contributed to its lack of usage: Few commercial bands are near enough that existing equipment can be simply modified to serve this band. There are numerous commercial bands ...


11

The specifications from AMSAT for the SO-50 are: The repeater consists of a miniature VHF receiver with sensitivity of -124dBm, having an IF bandwidth of 15 KHz. The receive antenna is a 1/4 wave vertical mounted in the top corner of the spacecraft. The receive audio is filtered and conditioned then gated in the control electronics prior to feeding ...


10

At power levels that low, you probably don't need an SWR meter permanently installed. You will find it useful to have an SWR meter or antenna analyzer available when building the antenna, though, to ensure it is properly operating on your chosen frequencies. Perhaps you can borrow one from a friend, mentor, or local radio club to use while building your kit?


10

I did a bit more reading, and it seems that the new version of the firmware meant I needed to use a different chirp profile. The solution that worked for me was to find a factory image from a radio with the firmware version I have (which Chirp reported), then import my channels via csv, and clone that resulting image onto the radio.


10

So you want to broadcast your location using backpack-portable equipment from deep in a narrow valley hundreds of miles from civilization. I'll assume that you would also like the ability to get a message out when necessary. These are very demanding requirements. I don't think that there is any inexpensive, 100% reliable way to do what you seem to want, ...


9

Yes, the baofeng stock antenna is the worst antenna I have ever used. I have both. The range on my 5W BaoFeng UV-5R, with the stock antenna is about 3 KM with direct line of sight and no obstacles, and get terrible audio reports and am unable to hit a repeater accurately any more than 2 km away. With the NA-701, I get about 5 KM distance, with better audio ...


9

The simplest way of accomplishing your goal doesn't require a conventional and expensive repeater system. It's completely passive (no electronics needed). Put a Yagi on your roof pointed at the repeater. Put an upside-down ground plane in your living area. Connect the two antennas with coax. You now have a passive repeater! Signals picked up on the Yagi ...


8

The Yaesu VX-5R had/has 50-54 MHz FM, 5 watts. Nice compact little radio! I think the VX-7 and VX-8 can also transmit on 6 m. It had a little extension of the rubber duck to make it work at 50 MHz, though I doubt it was very efficient. Antenna calculation: The whip is about 25 cm long, so I'll consider a 0.5 m dipole. Radiation resistance the dipole is 1.4 ...


7

Before getting my ham license I used MURS on my baofeng with no problems because there is simply no MURS traffic in my area. If I were still an unlicensed operator then I would still be using MURS with my baofeng UV-5R. But once you get the Technician license the penalties go way up (or at least the enforcement) and a ham doesn't need to use MURS anyway. ...


7

Most of the common disadvantages for Baofengs et al have to do with usability (e.g. poor user interface, odd squelch performance). The actual reception and transmission power is just fine. The majority of the disadvantages are negated when working with APRS, since it's the APRS modem interacting with the radio rather than a human being. The main thing you'd ...


7

Insofar as there is an agreed-upon definition of the term “mobile” (and “portable”, which is closely related/confusable and so I'm covering it here), this is how I have most frequently seen the terms used when people are being precise about it: Portable: A station set up in a temporary location. If you've parked a radio on a picnic table and strung a wire ...


6

If you don't need mobility, purchase an inexpensive directional 4 element Yagi antenna for 2m and operate it in vertical polarization, that is with the prongs of the yagi pointing up and down. You can sometimes find these small Yagi antennas used for ~$20-30. But note this will only help you for 2m, and should not be used on 70cm. For 70cm you can get a ...


6

Catalog descriptions are bogus. What they are describing are characteristics of monopole antennas in general, not either specific model. Clearly, they can't both be 1/4 wave antennas at the same frequency but also be different lengths. A 1/4 wave at 145 MHz is about 49 cm. Neither one is a 1/4 wave antenna,. What they probably are is electrically a 1/4 wave,...


6

No, there are not, because it is not legal to have a radio that can transmit in both CB and amateur radio bands. To be legal, CB radios must be part 95 type accepted. The FCC prohibits a device to be both part 95 type accepted and capable of being used in amateur radio frequencies. Having said that, many amateur radios are also wide band receivers, and ...


6

SSB phone requires good frequency stability to be intelligible. Anything over 10Hz of frequency difference between transmitter and receiver and the signal starts to sound funny; beyond 50-70 Hz of error, intelligibility starts to drop. Hitting that target is more difficult at higher frequencies than at low frequencies. In the HF bands, getting within 10Hz ...


5

Any reputable mag mount antenna will be a huge gain compared to the rubber ducky. I routinely can hit mid-level repeaters from about 15 miles away with my mag mount setup and 5W. If I'm extremely careful, I can hit the same repeaters from 5 miles away with the rubber ducky antenna, in order to pull that off, I have to hold the HT perfectly straight. One ...


5

The smarmy answer is of course, that cell phones are two way radios on either the 800Mhz band (Sprint & US Cellular) or the 1900MHz band (all the others). Not what you meant, I know. The old Nextel phones with their "push-to-talk" feature were two-way radios using the old 50 MHz taxi-dispatcher band. Later versions of this technology used 900MHz. I ...


5

All other things being equal, a longer HT whip will outperform a shorter whip. The shorter length is probably because of a larger loading coil, which could result in loss. The gain numbers from most antenna manufacturers should be taken with a grain of salt. They use wild assumptions when calculating it. In most cases HT whips are so cheap, one could buy ...


5

This is standard NMEA data format. The GPS is configured to provide the following NMEA strings: GPGGA, Essential fix data, time, location, quality of fix, altitude GPGSA, Dilution of precision and active satellites GPRMC, Recommended minimum data: position, velocity, vector, time GPVTG, Velocity and vector You'll notice much of the information is ...


5

I contacted the seller and am still waiting on a satisfactory reply. HOWEVER, I did seem to find a workaround. Thanks for everyone's response! Remove Password MD380/90 1. Go to folder the CPS is in (C:\TYT) 2. look for file - setting.ini 3. Right click and edit 4. password=0 change to password=password 5. Save Connect radio to PC and turn on in normal ...


5

and welcome to ham.stackexchange.com! Sorry, but the Elecraft KPA100 won't work at all with the Yaesu VX-8DR. The VX-8DR is a handheld that runs on the 6m/2m/1.25m/70cm bands; the KPA100 works on the ham bands between 80m–10m. What's more, the KPA100 is really meant to be part of the Elecraft K2, and isn't meant to be a stand-alone amplifier. You ...


4

Nickle Cadmium (NiCd) batteries are still quite popular for a variety of uses, however Nickle Metal Hydride (NiMH) and Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) batteries have, for the most part, replaced NiCds. Lithium Ion batteries are generally considered the better of the two, but each have their pros/cons. Lithium-Ion Pros: Li-ion batteries have over twice the energy ...


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