15

11(2) The Licensee shall only address Messages to other Amateurs or to the stations of those Amateurs and shall not encrypt these Messages for the purpose of rendering the Message unintelligible to other radio spectrum users. From the terms and conditions spelt out by OFCOM (pdf), the UK communications regulator. Alternately, in the license guidelines: ...


13

The issue came up recently when one amateur radio user petitioned the FCC to permit encrypted communications for emergency operations with the primary goal of complying with HIPAA health privacy laws. The ARRL urged the denial of this petition, and the FCC subsequently denied the petition. The major points of the ARRL's arguments were: it is ARRL’s ...


11

In the US, the FCC prohibits this type of operation if the purpose is to obscure the meaning of your transmission. 97.113 Prohibited Transmissions (4) ... messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning... In response to filings on this topic, the FCC has made it clear that this prohibition includes encryption. The FCC has also ...


11

If you are in the USA, check § 97.113 Prohibited transmissions of the FCC rules. Specifically, (4) Music using a phone emission except as specifically provided elsewhere in this section; communications intended to facilitate a criminal act; messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except as otherwise provided herein; obscene or ...


11

Yes, they are. Generally speaking, authentication is legal, obfuscating is not legal. So you could do a cryptographically signed hash that would be legal in the United States to transmit over Amateur Radio. It's worth mentioning that there is some debate as to how legal a cryptographically signed hash would be. I believe it would be legal, so long as it was ...


10

So as another take on it, you can engage in the thought experiment of "what happens if encryption is legal". Let's say you're a taxi operator and you want to dispatch via radio. Well usually you'd need a commercial license to do this, since amateur radio is strictly non-commercial. But if you can encrypt your traffic, who's to say it's commercial or not? You'...


6

For governments around the world to continue to trust that amateur radio has no nefarious purpose, it is essential that everyone that wishes to, can "listen in" to any amateur radio communications. Anything that hints at eroding this capability will likely be struck down in time through regulation. To pass the FCC legal hurdle regarding obfuscation, it must ...


6

It is prohibited in the US, with one exception. One is allowed to encrypt commands to an amateur satellite (Send from the ground to the satellite). Aside from that, encryption is prohibited.


4

Encryption on amateur radio is prohibited in most countries. There are some exceptions, in some countries, and for some specific use cases. You'll need to consult your local rules. Some countries (Australia being an example) allow encryption in emergency communications and relevant training activities. Some countries (US, for example) allow encryption for ...


3

Even though signing of a digest uses cryptographic techniques, this is permitted. The Part 97 regulations regarding obscuring clearly speaks of purpose/intent. The regulation you quoted is the only one that applies to this topic for amateur radio. The FCC has previously commented that encryption is prohibited under this regulation even if the algorithm is ...


2

Don N2IRZ wrote an article in CQ Magazine's August 2006 edition which made the case that data encryption is legal when it is used for the purpose of preventing unauthorized access. The context he's referring to is when using modified commercial WiFi routers which have channels that overlap with the amateur band (e.g. HSMM-Mesh/Broadband-Hamnet) and ...


1

According to clause 17(ff) in Ofcom publication, UK AMATEUR RADIO LICENCE, Section2: Terms,conditions and limitations, "Remote Control Operation" applies, "...where the Licensee has the ability to control the Radio Equipment from a different location to that where the Radio Equipment is located;" Since your control means and your radio will both be located ...


1

Please see: §97.309 RTTY and data emission codes. (a) Where authorized by §§97.305(c) and 97.307(f) of the part, an amateur station may transmit a RTTY or data emission using the following specified digital codes: (1) The 5-unit, start-stop, International Telegraph Alphabet No. 2, code defined in ITU-T Recommendation F.1, Division C (commonly known as “...


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