Hot answers tagged

16

You can, but you probably don't want to. CB radios are limited to a set of 40 channels, most don't have frequency control. That somewhat limits the utility in the ham band where we have a very wide swath of frequency we can use. A converted CB radio would, at best, have control over only a narrow portion of the 10 meter band. They are also limited in power....


14

It very much depends on the two countries. In general, there are two large international groups with which operating within the same group is fairly easy. However, even for these two, if you move to another country you should get a license for that country. The two groups are (From ARRL): CEPT- Primarily European countries IARU- Primarily the Americas. Many ...


14

If I just wanted to pass the test, then judging by some online practice tests, I could get all the way to Extra on my electrical knowledge, common sense, and a bit of luck, but that's not what I want to do! I think that they body of knowledge they are testing may once have been fairly focused, but it has become a bit muddled by attempts to include new ...


14

Yes, you can take all three exams in sequence at the same session and obtain an Extra class license. (I did and had no trouble.) Doing this, rather than getting a lower license class and upgrading later, has the small advantage that you will be assigned a shorter sequential call sign (without having to request one when you upgrade), as well as not paying ...


13

In the US, any person may operate under the direct supervision of an operator of a higher class. This is how the GOTA (get-on-the-air) stations work at field day, but it's applicable at any time. In most cases when operating in foreign countries under e.g. CEPT you do not gain any additional bands, but in some cases you may gain some additional operating ...


13

To extend on the legal part of the answer: Hams can use any radio to transmit, as long as they are in the right frequency band, are transmitting using allowed power, etc. Non-licensed radio services on the other hand are subject to a host of restrictions, generally including fixed antennas, small power limits, radio-by-radio certification, etc. To put ...


13

An amateur radio license only grants privileges on the amateur bands. You would need a different type of license to use other bands. The cell companies pay a premium for the license for their spectrum, and they are almost certainly not interested in relicensing it (if they even could). Moreover, LTE is just a protocol, so there is no dedicated spectrum for ...


11

The key wording is in 97.9(b) as referenced in 97.119: ...is authorized to exercise the rights and privileges of the higher operator class... and 97.119 says: "When the control operator is a person who is exercising the rights and privileges authorized by §97.9(b)..." So you only need to use the /AE suffix when you are using privileges only available ...


10

Yes, with some extra paperwork. ARRL has most of the rules for international operating. In the case of a US operator in the UK, you'd be operating under CEPT. You'd need to be an Extra - General licenses are recognized in some countries, but not in the UK. You'd also need proof of license and US citizenship, and a copy of the FCC official notice. Of course, ...


10

It is not required any more for any US license, as of 2008. It has not been required for the technician license since 1991. It is still required in some areas, and some international amateur radio licenses, in particular the IARP license, which may be used by US amateurs to operate outside of the US in IARP countries. Bottom line is, however, that fewer and ...


10

The ARRL renewals page (http://www.arrl.org/renewals) says: Amateur applications can be filed manually using paper forms or electronically over the Internet. Amateurs may electronically renew their FCC-issued licenses "on line" via the FCC web using FCC ULS . FCC permits on-line renewals at 90 days or less before a license will expire, and when ...


10

The question pools are available online from NCVEC: 2011 pool 2015 pool I downloaded these and ran them through diff. These are the big changes I noticed: Section G3E, which is about digital operating procedure, is significantly changed. There isn't anything especially new technology-wise there, but the question pool is quite different. Additionally, ...


10

Congratulations! This depends on the folks that gave you your test (Volunteer Examiners, or VEs), the organization they are working with (ARRL?), and the FCC (if you're in the US). A bottleneck anywhere can make it take up to a couple weeks, but likely you'll have a call sign about a week after the VEs submit your paperwork. Your best bet would be to ask ...


10

In the United States, for the most part, all radio transmissions fall into one of three categories: The operator is allowed to transmit on that frequency (amateur, "business band", aviation, military, etc.) The radio is allowed to transmit on that frequency (CB, FRS, MURS). The transmissions are very low-power ("Part 15": WiFi, Bluetooth, lots of other ...


10

When testing applicants that are vision impaired we use versions of the test that do not include any diagrams. I am a VE and there is a state school for the deaf and blind near us so we have had several vision impaired applicants over the years. Please try to let us know ahead of time so we can ready with the test and so that we can have an extra VE to read ...


10

I just purchased a UV-5R to hopefully integrate into business class radios my company uses. Unfortunately, this is not likely legal. Business radio is licensed under the FCC's Part 90 rules; those rules include 47 CFR § 90.203 - Certification required: "[…] each transmitter utilized for operation under this part […] must be of a type which has been ...


9

Most local emergency communications use VHF and UHF repeaters. If we're talking about coordinating CERT or public safety, search and rescue, that sort of thing, then yes, a technician is enough. On the other hand, regional and larger emergency communications (like the hurricane net which covers a large area, or the national traffic system which passes ...


9

I am a UK licensed Radio Amateur with some 39 years experience. I also design and build LTE cellular systems for a living. The best suited Amateur Radio spectrum for LTE operation is the 2.3 GHz band - this can easily accommodate a LTE-TDD (single frequency) system operating in LTE Band 40. Note that both FCC (and European) regulations for Amateur Radio ...


9

Here is the link that describes how to update your FCC information. http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?id=amateur&job=cft&page=cft_change_address I do mine on the website and I have not been charged for it. Within a few weeks a new copy of your license with the new address will arrive in the mail. As for not updating in a timely manner, ...


9

Fees to obtain a license are set by and payable to the volunteer examiner coordinator. They are typically small to free, and limited by §97.527 to reimbursement "for out-of-pocket expenses incurred in preparing, processing, administering, or coordinating an examination for an amateur operator license." Some VECs and their fees: ARRL: \$15 W5YI: \$14 GLAARG:...


9

You're correct in your understanding about region: given that you're operating in a part of the US that is in Region 2 (there are a few US overseas territories in Region 3), you need to conform to the Region 2 band plan, and not any other. FCC regulation 97.301(b), concerning authorized frequencies, grants the same privileges to a CEPT (non-novice) license-...


9

Having participated as a volunteer examiner in a few test sessions, I think there are a number of reasons this is the case: We tend to quietly give the pass/fail results — and, optionally, the number wrong or at least an encouraging "you nailed it!" or "you were so close this time!" — as soon as we've finished processing them. Most of the time others are ...


8

Once you are re-licensed and obtain a new automatically generated call sign, you may request your old call sign as a "vanity call sign". If it isn't presently assigned to anyone else, you'll be given it. You'll have to pay the fees for the vanity call sign, though, there's no other way for you to re-license under the old call sign after the two year waiting ...


8

Your frequency error is the difference between where your transmitter indicates you are transmitting, and where you actually are transmitting. The FCC does not regulate where you think you are transmitting. They only regulate where you are actually transmitting. Consequently, your frequency error can be whatever you want, as long as you keep it in the bands ...


8

This is answered somewhat in this question already, and the answer is no. And I will add some passages about the broadcasting part. To quote the relevant rule §97.113: §97.113 Prohibited transmissions. (a) No amateur station shall transmit: (1) Communications specifically prohibited elsewhere in this part; (2) Communications for hire or for ...


8

You will have to be assigned a call sign first. To apply for a vanity, you will need an FCC Registration Number (FRN). The rule is that you cannot receive a vanity call sign from a call sign group for which your operator class is not eligible. For example, if you are operator class T (technician), you can only receive call signs from groups C & D. If you ...


7

Dan's answer about which frequencies tend to be used for emergency communication is good, but I'd like to add another aspect you seem to be overlooking. Don't dismiss the possibility of such communications being done outside of the amateur bands. In the US (which appears to be the focus of this question because of its reference to Technician and General ...


7

This is pretty much the same as transmitting into a dummy load (or using the stock rubber duck antennas :) ). I don't think a canonical answer is possible; Part 97 is silent on the issue. But, if no one can hear you, you can't be interfering with anyone or "using" the spectrum, so I would say sure. Depending on what you are planning on doing (and on ...


7

I don't have an answer actually clearly applicable to this situation, but a couple of related scenarios come to mind: Every shielded digital electronic device is radiating "inside a RF sealed enclosure". Your scenario is different in that it's not a discrete device with built-in shielding. Part 15 §15.211 permits tunnel radio systems to “operate on any ...


7

I'm trying to find a better source, but according to this letter from Boeing petitioning the FCC in 2011, an experimental license is technically required to operate even within a Faraday cage, although they have an unofficial policy of permitting such actions. Finally, the Commission should codify its policy of permitting entities to conduct experiments ...


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