13

Having participated as a volunteer examiner in a few test sessions, I think there are a number of reasons this is the case: We tend to quietly give the pass/fail results — and should offer the number wrong with an encouraging "you nailed it!" or "you were so close this time!" — as soon as we've finished processing them. Most of the time ...


10

When testing applicants that are vision impaired we use versions of the test that do not include any diagrams. I am a VE and there is a state school for the deaf and blind near us so we have had several vision impaired applicants over the years. Please try to let us know ahead of time so we can ready with the test and so that we can have an extra VE to read ...


7

Yes, volunteer exam coordinators must provide accommodations for applicants with visual impairments. For the best experience, please contact the test team in advance so they can best prepare for your needs. The FCC's Part 97 regulations which govern the amateur radio service in the USA (you'll learn more about these as you study) cover this in section 97....


6

Unlike the ARRL, if you take your exam at a session given by the Laurel VEC, the VEs are not only allowed but encouraged to go over the missed questions with the candidates for exactly the reason you state; to help you learn the material. This is true whether you pass or fail the exam. (I am both an ARRL VE Team Liaison and Laurel VEC Team Lead.)


6

I can see your point definitely, but I think the process attempts to remain consistent with the past and prevents the examiners from being further burdened during the testing session. Although, in the US, the ARRL is making the rules now (apparently), historically, the FCC examiners did NOT discuss the results of the tests. You were handed the questions ...


6

For general info, check http://www.arrl.org/volunteer-examiners. It will point you to a PDF manual for ARRL VEC. From http://www.arrl.org/files/file/VEs/VE%20Manual%20Web%20FINAL%202014.pdf: "Once accredited as an examiner in the ARRL/VEC’s program, your accreditation credentials will be good until your FCC license expires." Also "ARRL ...


6

Congress sets the rules the FCC has to follow, and the rule in particular requiring an age limit is Title 47, Volume 5, Part 97, Subpart F: § 97.509 Administering VE requirements. ... (b) Each administering VE must: ... (2) Be at least 18 years of age; It would take an act of Congress to change this rule. I haven't discovered the reason for ...


5

Answer the first part of your question: Based on the FCC description of club stations, I think the VE exam answer is referring to a club station license. The description of the club station license from the above source: A club station license allows members of an amateur radio club to have a station operating under a club call sign. The license is granted ...


3

Blind operators typically end up being highly skilled CW operators which are highly valued in ham clubs that do contesting and are greatly appreciated and frequently treated as a VIP. But as the hobby is largely reliant on listening and speaking, blind operators integrate well even without CW skills. Testers do not typically have resources to accommodate ...


3

This answer is for valid for the US only: 47 CFR § 97.507 addresses the preparation of the telegraphy message or the question set. It does not directly address the testing session itself. 47 CFR § 97.509 addresses the testing session. Paragraph (b) states: (b) Each administering VE must: (1) Be accredited by the coordinating VEC; (2)...


3

While a VE has answered definitively above, I'd also add another kind of answer. When I was studying for my license exam, the study site repeatedly pointed out that "if you have trouble with math, you can skip all the math questions and still pass the exam." They made the same point about certain other sub-classes of questions, such as band allocation. I'm ...


1

I don't like the answer "just pass enough of the rest of the exam so it doesn't matter if you fall this one." That is doing a disservice to our blind friends. The point of the question is just to identify what the schematic symbol is for the electrical component. Just describe what you see in basic detail. Especially when we're talking about the Technician ...


1

You as an individual ham actually hold two licenses printed on one piece of paper, an operator license and station license (it actually shows both). The station license permits you to build an Amateur radio station. The operator license describes your class of privileges for actually operating it. http://www.w5yi.org/page.php?id=146


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