A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

New answers tagged

2

To add to some already great answers here, the very first thing you should do is listen on the repeater's input frequency. Do you hear it then? If not, then drive fairly close to the repeater site. Note that an off-frequency signal that overloads the repeater's receiver might also overload your HT. If that happens, then it would be prudent to attenuate the ...


1

Find and use a different repeater for the interim. Hold a regular fund raiser to fund #3 below. Make finding the culprit or culprits an ongoing contest with a reward in your club. In other words: Put a big fat bounty on em! ;-) Once you've ID'ed them, the rest will be much easier. If your club is unable to find em, add more clubs!


3

In the U.S., if you can foxhunt the interfering transmitter's location, then you might try sending this information to the ARRL: http://www.arrl.org/amateur-auxiliary The ARRL has access to lawyers who can send a polite letter informing the source of the potential Federal law violation, and the potential monetary penalties for such. This kind of letter ...


4

The first thing to do is to listen on the repeater's input frequency. If you hear the interfering signal on the input frequency, then you're probably dealing with deliberate interference; otherwise, you most likely have a technical problem. If your problem is deliberate interference, then if I were in your shoes I would absolutely use radio direction ...


2

One of my local repeaters has a sound bleed from the (very high power) TV transmission on the same tower, and all the repeaters I use exhibit signal problems and interference that might or might not be intentional. For instance, the same one that has the TV bleed also sometimes (re)transmits a Morse code station ID for another station. My Morse is pretty ...


3

The most important frequencies to have programmed into your VHF/UHF radio would be the VHF simplex calling frequency, and the frequencies of the more important local repeaters, especially the ones that have emergency power such as solar panels. BaoFeng radios are notoriously difficult to program channels into using the front panel buttons. There is ...


3

If something bad goes down (state-wide or nationwide), what frequencies should I be tuning into? Broadcast radio! Obviously, if your emergency services tried to let a lot of people know something is wrong, they'd do that on a frequency that most people actually have a receiver for. For emergency communications (i.e. you want to actually transmit), things ...


Top 50 recent answers are included