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To answer part of the original question that hasn't yet been answered, duplex (a.k.a. offset, meaning repeater mode) isn't used on the VHF calling frequency used in the US and Canada, 146.52 MHz. Neither is a tone squelch code, a.k.a. a "PL" tone, properly called a CTCSS tone. Just plain old FM simplex. I would think that the calling frequency tends to be ...


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Your GMRS license is only good on GMRS allocated frequency bands using GMRS equipment. Similarly, your Amateur Radio Service (ARS) license is only good on ARS allocated frequency bands using ARS equipment. When you pass your ARS Tech exam, wait until the FCC issue you (via the CORES) your unique ARS callsign before getting on air. You can't use your GMRS ...


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WA9ZZZ's answer missed the issue of control of the repeater. The repeater must be under control of one or more control operators, or under automatic control, at all times when the repeater is on. There are three types of control: Primary control, where a control operator is physically near the equipment and monitoring the repeater, ready to intervene as ...


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The regulations for an amateur radio repeater are fairly minimal. To answer your specific questions: "Does one need a particular license?" Your license must permit transmissions on the repeater output frequency. That is, general or higher for 10m, technician or higher for higher frequency bands. There is no special repeater license. (There used to be.) ...


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You will need to continue to use your GMRS on GRMS frequencies with GMRS radios and once you get it your ham call sign on ham frequencies. The call signs for GMRS have a different format than ham radio call signs. From what I can see GMRS call signs are 3 or 4 letters followed by 4 numbers. Ham radio call signs are 1 or 2 letters, 1 number, and 1 to 3 ...


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In some areas where there are a lot of active HAMs you might hear some traffic. Also if you want contacts you do need to call. Just listening for some else to call is seldom a good strategy. Keep in mind that VHF is fairly sort range especially with a low antenna mount like a car driving down the road in a valley. if you are looking for conversations ...


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Only on GMRS frequencies. And technically only with GMRS radio gear. Wait until your ham call is issued to use it. It will be available in CORES.


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ยง97.113(a)(4) states: No amateur station shall transmit [...] obscene or indecent words or language These are not the same regulations that prohibit TV stations from broadcasting obscene or indecent content. However, the above language applies specifically to amateur radio in its entirety. To my knowledge, the U.S. Code does not explicitly state what is ...


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The amateur radio community is largely self regulated. So violations of amateur radio rules are rarely directly directly observed by the FCC. Usually it requires complaints from the amateur radio community for the FCC to initiate action. Typically, for FCC to make a direct observation of a violation, it would have to be a repeat violation, very flagrant, ...


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FCC obscenity regulations no such thing. It's US Code, and the FCC is only the enforcing organ. So, the FCC themselves say they enforce things on a "we know when we see it" basis, which, for me not coming from a US background, is a pretty strange way of regulating things fairly, since that basically means there's mostly case law, ie. previous decisions to ...


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I have noticed that hams using CW, PSK31, RTTY, etc, use different equations to describe their bandwidth requirements. Over the years, I have used an equation which combines the "k" and the "baud" and the "freq shift" : BW = (k) (baud) (delta freq) . This has worked well with various forms of pulse signals, and matches spectragraph samples of RF signals. ...


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Yes, there is a maximum legal WPM for CW. The higher the data rate, the more bandwidth a signal occupies. Thus, the bandwidth tag. That also applies to CW. As the WPM is increased, the wider the signal will be. And at some point, the bandwidth of the signal will be so great that it violates FCC regulations. According to Scott, the maximum legal speed would ...


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I would completely agree with the comment about the Canadian exam being very tough without an electronics background. I've wanted to get my license for years, but I'm really only interested in that so I can have something in the vehicle. I have zero interest in building my own antenna towers or building my own radios. I have no interest in competitions or ...


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