18

The ARRL runs a booth at Dayton Hamvention since 2012 where people can submit their HTs to be tested for spectral purity. Over the years 2016-2019, 100% of the Alinco, Icom, Kenwood, and Yaesu HTs they tested were compliant with the standards laid out in Section 97.307. Only 7.5% of the Baofeng HTs they tested were compliant, with 27% being "borderline" (...


17

They are legal to use, but only on the amateur bands. (Of course, you'll need to get a license first). There was a lot of debate on whether they were legal, but the FCC finally stated that they were. Thus the older search results you found, such as this one. Since they are not type-accepted, they are not legal to use on other bands such as FRS, GMRS, etc.


11

The answer is YES! Nothing in the rules prevents you from using the existence of your license to help you get a job. If you plan on going into a radio/TV/Cable engineering job, a amateur radio license(at the Extra level or Advanced Qualifications in Canada) can be very helpful to your career. Study learn the concepts and understand the math to pass the ...


10

Here's 47 CFR § 97.313: § 97.313 Transmitter power standards. (a) An amateur station must use the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications. (b) No station may transmit with a transmitter power exceeding 1.5 kW PEP. So sorry, you're only allowed a maximum of 1.5 kW per station, not per antenna. I can anticipate a further ...


9

The FCC issues licenses for a particular service (e.g. broadcast, amateur, land mobile, common carrier, etc.). Each service is regulated by a specific part of the FCC regulations (e.g., Part 97 for Amateur Radio Service). These regulations determine the limitations on a licensees use of spectrum. There may also be license specific limitations. In effect, ...


9

The requirement on the FCC side of this is that transmissions may not be encrypted in order to hide their content. In the case of C4FM (or the other protocol mentioned in another answer, DMR, or as well in JT8/JT4) anyone can either obtain software or buy a device that supports these protocols and listen to the transmission. There would only be a violation ...


8

If you get a ham license, can you, later on, get a job with that license, or at least display it on a resume. Is that possible. The other answers already cover this pretty thoroughly, so in short: it's fine to include it on your résumé as an educational/certification accomplishment, but… …you may not earn money for operating a ham radio station [with a few ...


8

No — as of 2020 you're not obligated to change your callsign if you move within the US. Even if you have an Alaska/Hawaii/Guam "restricted" callsign, you can keep it if you leave. All you need to do is notify the FCC of your new mailing address via ULS. However, if you want to change your callsign when you move, you can. You can request the next available ...


8

The grace period is two years. You can renew your license within the grace period, but after that, the call sign will be available for reassignment. If you were to take and pass an exam after the grace period, you would be assigned a new call sign. However, if at that time, your old call sign is still available, you would be able to apply for it as a vanity ...


8

The good news is that the license you'll need for that particular radio is an amateur radio license which is only a $35 application fee. You will need to pass an exam before you can apply. As far as I'm aware, to operate that radio without violating FCC regs, you will have to have a license. Also, as Zeiss notes in the comment below, there's no practical way ...


7

§97.113 Prohibited transmissions states: (a) No amateur station shall transmit: (1) Communications specifically prohibited elsewhere in this part; (2) Communications for hire or for material compensation, direct or indirect, paid or promised, except as otherwise provided in these rules; (3) Communications in which the station licensee or control operator ...


6

Better double check. There's no requirement to identify at the beginning of a communication (though it's common practice, and was required at one time), only every ten minutes and at the end of the communication. The "every ten minutes" is often handled (say, on 2 meter or 440 band repeaters, which is where Technician licensees most commonly use voice ...


6

Amateur radio prohibits being paid to transmit. However, nothing in the amateur radio rules prohibits you from using skills developed as an amateur radio operator in a professional setting. Part of the purpose of amateur radio is to encourage development of such skills for professional use. Putting amateur radio on your resume is an indicator that you ...


6

Does "phone emissions" include digitally encoded audio emissions? Yes. For example, FreeDV is a phone emission. FreeDV consists of multiple PSK carriers: first symbol G. These carriers transmit a stream of bits: second symbol 1. And it is designed to take a sound at one station and reproduce it at the other station. That is telephony: third symbol ...


6

A7RW would be the call sign of a ham in Qatar, rather than the United States. The prefixes AA – AL are allocated to the United States. So AA7RW, AB7RW, AC7RW, etc. up to AL7RW would be valid US call signs. The FCC have certain call signs that they won't issue, like a call sign with a three-letter suffix starting with X (so I heard, can't find a source), ...


5

For most purposes, there is no "official" paper license in the United States anymore. Your record in the FCC's online database is what gives you a license to operate. However, if you like, you may download and print a PDF from their system. It looks like this: except that, for your own license, you can download one that says "OFFICIAL COPY" instead of "...


5

In general, in the USA, transmitting without a license is only permissible under Part 15. Generally, this imposes limitations in the form of either radiated power restrictions (for instance, building an experimental transmitter to operate in the AM broadcast band, so you can use a common consumer radio to check operation) or in the type/model of device used....


5

The 1.5kW limit is really per transmission. But there are other limits as well that may be reached first. Some bands have a much lower power limit. Also, high on that list is safety, and this isn't just a good idea, it's legally required in the amateur radio regulations. Above 50w and certainly above 100w you should be doing an environmental study to make ...


4

The ARRL's band chart (PDF) includes the maximum allowed power for stations in the United States and its territories. Sometimes the power limit depends on the license class of the operator and/or the band; in that case, the power limit is adjacent to the graphic for that license class and/or band. If no power limit is listed there, then the power limit is ...


4

I don't know what protocol the Garmin 320 and 430 dog tracking collars use, but it is highly unlikely that they use AX.25 packet as their protocol, because that protocol is old and slow, and therefore harder on batteries. If they don't use AX.25-based APRS packets, then you wouldn't be able to receive the packets on a Kenwood TH-D74A.


4

No. These collars do not transmit in the ham bands nor do they use APRS. While many ham receivers can receive outside the ham bands, the protocol used by the Astro is proprietary, best I can tell. So to demodulate and decode it with anything except Garmin equipment will require some reverse engineering.


4

No. Yes. There's no particular reason to think so. The UK and the US have both adopted CEPT T/R 61-01 regarding reciprocal amateur operation. Despite the fact that CEPT is the "European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations", it's independent of the EU (it long predates the EU), and parties to T/R 61-01 don't have to be ...


4

I'll post this as a separate answer since it isn't meant as a thorough technical answer. I haven't thoroughly researched everything below and I figure one of the mods might decide to remove it. However... It seems to me that you don't have a clear understanding of the different radio "systems" (for lack of a better word that comes to mind now), so ...


4

As of 2021, the FCC will send an e-mail to your address on file when your application is approved with a link to your updated license PDF (but no details in the e-mail body itself). It will be sent later on the day your batch is processed; mine was sent at 17:55 ET.


4

There are lots of proprietary codecs used in amateur radio. They are allowed in most countries for amateur use simply because they have not been made illegal. But I don't think that's what you're asking. I think most of us would agree that proprietary codecs are generally against the spirit of amateur radio; we prefer open protocols that anyone can use, ...


3

On April 30, 2020, the FCC issued a Public Notice, "WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS BUREAU CONFIRMS THAT AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE OPERATOR LICENSE EXAMINATIONS MAY BE HELD REMOTELY." According to the ARRL Letter for May 7, 2020, The FCC opened the door to remotely administered examinations in a June 5, 2014, FCC Report and Order, noting that, since the VE system ...


3

The article is mistaken about at least one thing. It may be illegal to market that radio in the US (I honestly don't care to read the tea leaves to find out if that's true or not, but it's certainly possible), but that has no bearing at all on whether you can legally operate one in the US as an amateur. Amateur transcievers don't have to be certified in any ...


3

You do have to be licensed to transmit on amateur (ham) radio frequencies. This requires passing a test, but it is not a hard test. There are many websites, Phone apps, and books that can help you study for the test. The tests sessions are done by volunteers. The largest group of Volunteer Examiners is the American Radio Relay League or ARRL. On thier web ...


3

There's really not a upper or lower limit to price -- it entirely depends on what capabilities you want. At the low end, you can get a receive only SDR for $20; several suggestions can be found at rtl-sdr.com There are several hand held UHF/VHF tranceivers available for under $50. The quality of these are questionable, but they usually last at least 2 ...


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