33

On voice, use "Mayday Mayday Mayday" at the beginning and end of the transmission. This is only for life-threatening emergencies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayday_(distress_signal) For other emergency situations, like reporting a wildfire that does not directly threaten you, use "Break Emergency" at the beginning of the call. This is a good guide to ...


24

Assuming that you have an amateur radio license makes this easier, but it's quite possible that the UK legal language includes provisions that may be applicable and allow transmission without a license. It depends on the specifics of the emergency in question. I would strongly recommend familiarizing yourself with the relevant definitions in the legal code ...


14

11(2) The Licensee shall only address Messages to other Amateurs or to the stations of those Amateurs and shall not encrypt these Messages for the purpose of rendering the Message unintelligible to other radio spectrum users. From the terms and conditions spelt out by OFCOM (pdf), the UK communications regulator. Alternately, in the license guidelines: ...


11

If you are in the USA, check § 97.113 Prohibited transmissions of the FCC rules. Specifically, (4) Music using a phone emission except as specifically provided elsewhere in this section; communications intended to facilitate a criminal act; messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning, except as otherwise provided herein; obscene or ...


10

Yes, with some extra paperwork. ARRL has most of the rules for international operating. In the case of a US operator in the UK, you'd be operating under CEPT. You'd need to be an Extra - General licenses are recognized in some countries, but not in the UK. You'd also need proof of license and US citizenship, and a copy of the FCC official notice. Of course, ...


9

You're correct in your understanding about region: given that you're operating in a part of the US that is in Region 2 (there are a few US overseas territories in Region 3), you need to conform to the Region 2 band plan, and not any other. FCC regulation 97.301(b), concerning authorized frequencies, grants the same privileges to a CEPT (non-novice) license-...


7

If this is something you are interested in on an ongoing basis as a volunteer, then you should look into joining RACES and/or ARES in the US, and RAYNET in the UK: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Amateur_Civil_Emergency_Service http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_Radio_Emergency_Service http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Amateurs_Emergency_Network ...


6

This is not commonplace. Most operators in the UK get along fine with the 400W limit. Given the path losses inherent in Earth-Moon-Earth - hundreds of decibels - the antenna is a much more important factor than is the power. You need every extra bit of push you can get, but if you're not making it at 400W, 1500W isn't likely to be much better. Remember that ...


6

Unfortunately not in the eyes of Ofcom. While you can restrict the power usage down to 0.5 Watts, the antenna is removable. You'll notice that most of the stuff sold on the high-street will have solid antennas. For the PMR frequency use, as part of the "license-free agreement", apparatus in use must meet the high-street requirements. Worth noting though, ...


6

As a UK license holder operating in the United States, you will be operating under CEPT Recommendation T/R 61-01. According to the CEPT regulations(PDF), it explicitly states that: The CEPT Licence permits utilisation of all frequency bands allocated to the Amateur Service and Amateur Satellite Service and authorised in the country where the amateur ...


5

On the west coast USA there is a slow CW traffic net that meets each night on the 80 meter band. The rules for this net is nothing faster than 10 wpm. It is a dual purpose net, teaching traffic handling skills and available for those who are not up to the CW speeds for a regular net. The regular CW traffic nets are about 20 wpm on average. So, that is one ...


5

QRS actually means "Please slow down" and is not really defined as a specific speed. So basically what they are trying to do is be as inclusive as possible. When I earned my Novice license in 1971 the speed required was 5 wpm. Then when I earned Advanced in 1977 it was 13 wpm. I am studying now for the Amateur Extra, and am amazed that there is no ...


5

I hold an Amateur Extra licence from the United States and have moved to the United Kingdom. I sent an application to Ofcom for a Full reciprocal licence and received the following response. I can operate for three months for free, then £20 each six months for an indefinite length. I plan on arguing my case as the United States does not issue Harmonized ...


5

It is prohibited in the US, with one exception. One is allowed to encrypt commands to an amateur satellite (Send from the ground to the satellite). Aside from that, encryption is prohibited.


5

Repeaters take time and money to set up and maintain. Many repeaters are operated by a club or a group - you may want to consider pooling resources with other local hams. Unlike in the US, UK amateur repeaters are individually licensed. You must get approval from Ofcom, including a Notice of Variation. This is because your base license does not allow ...


5

The UK band plan for the 2m (VHF) band can be found here on the RSGB website. In the UK, the 2m band is between 144.000MHz and 146.000MHZ. Of note is the section 145.5935 - 145.7935MHz, which are the repeater outputs. Depending on where you are in the UK, there should be at least one repeater that you can here there. Whether or not there is any activity is ...


5

The field strength in volts/meter as a function of effective radiated power and distance is given by: $$E=\frac{7.01\sqrt{P_{ERP}}}{d} \tag 1$$ where d is the distance from the radiating antenna in meters and PERP is the effective radiated power in watts. So you can see your sample problem was chosen such that the 7 meter distance cancels out the upper 7....


4

OK, I'm a mere Foundation Licence holder, but other than the increased power, no extra privileges open up at Intermediate Level - it is only with the Advanced/Full Licence that the extras arrive Mostly these around Notice of Variations to hold Special Event calls and/or operate Club callsigns and/or to set up and run a repeater - and to operate on some ...


4

Encryption on amateur radio is prohibited in most countries. There are some exceptions, in some countries, and for some specific use cases. You'll need to consult your local rules. Some countries (Australia being an example) allow encryption in emergency communications and relevant training activities. Some countries (US, for example) allow encryption for ...


4

The normal answer is no. There is one exception however, in that if the Foundation holder is directly "operating under the supervision of a Full Licence holder". See Clause 7, para 2.76 and 2.77 of Ofcom's "Guidance for licensees" document. You can find this document at: Guidance for licensees


4

The frequencies your neighbor would be transmitting are different than the ones your own communications would use. They should not interfere with your utilities. Occasionally, funny things like old metal connections can end up re-broadcasting related frequencies instead of the original one, but this is usually accounted for as well when the allocations are ...


3

if it is legal, or desirable Radio Amateurs may use any language which they can speak. I am not aware that there are any countries where the use of, or the not-use of, a particular language is stipulated in the license. But IANAL, and there are many countries. if it is legal, or desirable If the licensed Amateur wants to use his own native language, ...


3

It is ok. Hams may use any language they want if both sides agree to use it. If ham calls CQ in Arabic that is invitation to use that language in QSO.


3

I used the 14.300 maritime net frequency to undeclare an emergency. My vessel was dismasted in the Gulf Stream during a Bermuda-Newport sailboat race in 2005. Had the situation been both urgent and life threatening, a repeated 'mayday' would've been appropriate. If urgent but non-life threatening, then 'pan' or 'break' would have gotten everybody quickly ...


3

I can answer this question myself at this point as I've just completed the practical last night. @AndrejaKo provided a perfect example of the whole exercise in his video clip. Thanks also to the Essexham channel for that information. It was simply a matter of: Calling CQ on the VHF calling frequency 145.500. Finding a clear frequency, checking it's clear ...


3

The restrictions are due to MOD (Ministry of Defense, military) use. There are also some secondary business users in the spectrum. If you would look at the primary allocations in the UK, you might be surprised by the amount of spectrum allocated to the MOD. Ofcom maintains spectrum allocation data on this topic: UK65 - By special arrangement civil Land ...


3

Written permission or prohibition to bring ham radio gear on board is proffered by some of the large cruise lines. For example, Carnival gives written permission by way of their published policy where as Norwegian specifically denies permission to possess ham radio equipment on board (or even a satellite phone!). Once on board, the captain of the ship must ...


2

Phone patches (autopatches) are not legal in the UK. The restriction is largely because a phone patch allows you to contact non-licensed people using amateur radio. Of course, in an actual emergency, anyone can transmit anything on any frequency - but in a non-emergency situation there are strict restrictions on 'third-party traffic' (i.e. passing messages ...


2

According to Wikipedia (which is never wrong?), these devices implement IEEE 802.15.4, which defines among other things the frequencies upon which they operate. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.15.4 From that page, there are three radio bands those devices can use: 868-868.6MHz (Europe only), 902-928MHz (North America only) and 2400–2483.5MHz (...


2

If I am not wrong, XBee works at 2.4 GHz, which is a free band used worldwide. You do not need a license to use this frequency. However, there are some other frequencies which need a license. I would still recommend you to search the country-specific frequencies free to use. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISM_band


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