12

I believe you have encountered a Part 15 radio station. United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Part 15 (47 CFR 15) covers such things as garage door openers and the like. As such, and due to the fact that they are unlicensed by definition, there is no station-identification requirement. Note that this section covers both intentional and ...


11

Were the contacts on the day of a major contest? Chances are that some other station with a callsign close to yours was operating and several operators misread his call as yours. I, too, get the occasional QSL card or eQSL for a time when I wasn't operating (and they are usually during a major contest). Unless you have definitive proof that someone else ...


6

According to ARRL: Identification for US amateurs is the US call separated by a stroke and the appropriate Canadian prefix identifier (e.g. N1KB/VE3) In every case I can think of, one is required to identify the location from which they are transmitting, if it is not in their call sign, or at least a different country. And usually they want more than ...


5

That hasn't been the law for many years. From §97.119: (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel at the end of each communication, and at least every 10 minutes during a communication ... Therefore, it is perfectly legal to wait until we have talked for ...


5

In the USA (based on your callsign) I know the FCC specifies /KT, /AG, /AA and /AE because they are in the US callsign group. According to the FCC (97.119): "If an indicator is self-assigned, it must be included before, after, or both before and after, the call sign. No self-assigned indicator may conflict with any other indicator specified by the FCC Rules ...


5

When doing a diagnostic self-reception, it's typically advantageous to give the receiver as much chance to identify the channel as possible. Wouldn't it be cool if your identification could be used to measure the channel itself? That way, you'd stay on the air for as shortly as possible. So, you'd typically would want to send something that is spectrally ...


4

I don't see why not as long as you followed the regulations for ID and transmission mode. There are beacons, satellites, balloons and more transmitting telemetry. Beyond the laws I would recommend following the band plans for where to transmit and pay attention to where the signals from your buoy would reach. For example, the lower end of the 70cm band ...


4

Identification is governed by §97.119: (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel at the end of each communication, and at least every 10 minutes during a communication, for the purpose of clearly making the source of the transmissions from the station known to ...


4

Yes - they can ID your station. Part 97 does not specify who must identify your station, rather, that it must be done in 10 minute intervals. As a licensee, you are ultimately responsible for all transmissions that come from your station. If there is third party traffic (your friend talking), this means you must be present at the control point to disable ...


4

If it continues to happen I would report it to the FCC via the FCC's website here. http://www.fcc.gov/complaints


2

I agree, don't report till you witness it. Keep your logs but don't claim the contacts in case the FCC contacts you. It works as testimony that you didn't make the contacts. There are several possibilities here. The person has a call close to yours and was not pronouncing it well. Or, the receiving stations didn't copy well and went to web for correction and ...


2

One time is an error, multiple times seems on purpose. Report it to the FCC in case they violate any laws or frequency uses.


2

Make sure you follow the regulations on 'unattended operation'. And if you are going to be floating a buoy into the sea, be aware that you may end up transmitting from the territory of another country, at which point your transmission could well be very illegal. If you ended up floating a 'message in a bottle' beacon that made its way to North Korean waters,...


2

The rules are very clear on this point. Sec. 97.119 Station identification (a) Each amateur station, except a space station or telecommand station, must transmit its assigned call sign on its transmitting channel at the end of each communication, and at least every 10 minutes during a communication, for the purpose of clearly making the source of the ...


2

Of interest here: in the areas under the jurisdiction of the U.S. FCC, legal unlicensed operation in the FM broadcast band is limited to systems producing a maximum field intensity of 250 µV/m at a distance 3 meters in every direction from the transmit antenna. The applicable Rule is found in 47 CFR §15.239. That maximum free-space field of 250 µV/m @ 3 ...


2

As I understand it, the bare call sign in (English) voice or Morse (as appropriate for your license class and the band or sub-band you're transmitting in) is the minimum. You can attach additional information if you wish -- for instance, a couple 2m repeaters I use regularly transmit Morse calls signs like "W4NC RPT". Your beacon could be something akin to ...


1

Probably you are seeing the results of the AGC on your radio adjusting the front end gain of your radio between when there is no signal and when there is a strong signal. Just because you hear static does not mean that there is a carrier. It just means that your radio is trying very hard to find a signal and has demodulated noise into white noise. If this ...


1

More or less any way you want... Some options are: Mix the call sign into the video as an overlay in a corner voice or morse code in the audio track Call sign slide at end of transmission morse code in CW or MFM after video modulation stops (this is rare) Audio track is probably the simplest. The video overlay is frequently used with NTSC video, but ...


1

Licensing does NOT only apply to commercial use. Generally, any copyrighted material that is intended for the general public needs to be licensed (i.e., played in bars, restaurants, even Part 15 stations). However, BMI is currently the only licensing agency that requires a license for Part 15 broadcasters. Both SESAC and ASCAP have stated in writing that ...


1

I don't know any radio firmware that would support blocking a specific ID. It would be easy to implement in MMDMHost. Call Alert is a ringer function. If a radio receives a call alert signal then it rings and sends back an answer to the caller and the caller radio shows a message about the successful delivery.


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