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11

< friend's call sign > < your call sign > or < friend's call sign > this is < your call sign > or < friend's call sign > < your call sign > calling


6

Common practice is to give your own call sign last. So, if KA1ABC is calling KZ8ZYX, they'd call "Kay zed eight zed wye ex, kay aeh one aeh bee cee." Regulations, however, don't require doing it this way. What US regs require is that you give your own call sign at least every ten minutes during an ongoing "communication" and at the end of the "...


6

146.520 MHz is the national calling frequency for FM voice. It's a "simplex" frequency, meaning that you call on this frequency and then listen for a reply on the same frequency. (It is "national" in the US, but that does not guarantee that many people are actively monitoring this frequency! YMMV) If you're interested in other modes, there are other more-...


5

Ron points to the band plan and that's where you should start. I've redacted it somewhat to the bands most appropriate for simplex work. Note that depending on where you are, there might be large chunks of the repeater frequencies unused. Or you could live between two major metropolitan areas like me where there are NO unallocated repeater pairs...If they ...


4

How can I estimate the path loss The answer seems to be to pick one from a catalog of available path-loss models and apply the formula. Here, I'd try using the Hata model for urban areas. The model was originally made for portable cellular systems, so it uses a bit different terminology. The formula is not so complicated: $$L_{50} =69.55 +26.16 \cdot \...


3

I have my VHF rig in my pickup truck set to 146.52 MHz all of the time when I am driving. In an hour's time I would guess I hear maybe 3 or 4 copyable signals. My main use is to help someone out by answering questions that are asked (frequently, traffic snarls and/or other travel related things of mobile operators). Also, not long ago I was stuck in ...


3

I'd recommend saying something like this, "This is KA1ABC calling KZ8ZYX". HAM radio can be very conversational. We call it "rag chewing" but that term is just part of the jargon that evolves in almost every hobby or profession. Outside some contests where people are trying to make as many contacts as possible with in a time limit using a specific verbiage ...


3

You should have no problems doing 7 km with a (presumably 5W) HT even with the rubber duck antenna, outside. If you wanted to talk from inside, you will probably want an exterior antenna, but almost any common 2m antennas will do the job. A simple J pole is popular, you could even use a mobile antenna sited out a window.


3

"Uni-directional" antennas are usually not truly "uni"-directional - that is, they don't only radiate signal in a single direction. Instead, they radiate much more strongly in their frontal direction, with a weaker degree of radiation in other directions. As such, if you have two uni-directional antennas near each other but pointed in different directions, ...


2

The ARRL band plan shows: A band plan refers to a voluntary division of a band to avoid interference between incompatible modes. Listen through the simplex range of frequencies from the chart. Listen some more. If the frequency(ies) you choose are not in use, by all means throw your call out with "Is this frequency in use?" a few times - then go ahead ...


2

I think it depends a little on the particular radio in question. On my Yaesu FTM-400 I will receive any APRS beacon within range of my radio that transmits a 100 Hz tone (the digi won't forward the 100 Hz tone). However when another station has a 100 Hz tone set, I will get an audible beep when the beacon comes through announcing that the other station is ...


1

In some areas where there are a lot of active HAMs you might hear some traffic. Also if you want contacts you do need to call. Just listening for some else to call is seldom a good strategy. Keep in mind that VHF is fairly sort range especially with a low antenna mount like a car driving down the road in a valley. if you are looking for conversations ...


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