8

Others do not gain access to the content of the message In the US amateur radio service, transmitting “messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning” is prohibited by §97.113 and specifically for spread-spectrum (SS) by §97.311. I would imagine other jurisdictions have similar rules which prohibit such transmissions and/or require that ...


8

That depends largely on your environment. If you have a separate room, and guests, children, and others are unlikely to enter, and more unlikely to touch anything if they do enter, then it's probably fine to simply leave your radio on and tuned into your preferred frequency 24/7 with the key or mic on the desk. If you need to leave it in the living area ...


7

I'd say your best bet is to avoid handing over your hashed password entirely. Instead, use a zero-knowledge authentication scheme; see this security.SE question for more details. Zero Knowledge Authentication will make it so that it doesn't matter who you "give" your response to - even if a malicious server requests authentication (or intercepts other ...


5

Yes & No. The Baofeng is capable of transmitting on FRS/GMRS & MURS. But its not legal to do so (except maybe on GMRS with a license). And no frequency is "secure" as in "private" with any handheld radio that I've ever seen. PL tones, (aka Privacy Codes) are not private at all. This is a popular misconception promoted by manufacturers of those bubble-...


4

It's actually your mailing address that gets listed, not your station location, however for most hams they are the same. You can, however, have a P.O. Box listed instead of a physical location, if you want. (See 97.23). As to the security aspect: I really doubt there are a lot of thieves listening on the ham bands for who's got an expensive radio to go ...


4

Frequency hopping is more typically considered an ECCM measure. That is to say that a transciever that continuously cycles frequencies in accordance with some "hop set" is more difficult to jam than a single-channel radio system. In and of itself, it doesn't constitute proper encryption of your signal -- you are still transmitting data in plain text. It ...


3

What is "proper" grounding and protection? In my experience, most amateur stations that have installed grounding and surge protection devices have not installed them properly. Surge protection devices are designed to handle relatively small voltage transients, not handle surge currents on the order of a lightning strike. And with the tremendous currents ...


3

Legality is a big issue. Not to be ignored. There is no legal way for you to do as you suggest in the USA. This radio is too powerful to be legal on FRS. You need a license for GMRS. Applications are in the $90 range. MURS provides exactly the kind of service you are asking about. MURS is license-free All MURS radios must be FCC Type-Certified for ...


2

As far as I know the probability of direct strike to the antenna is considered relatively small. And if it will happen it is unlikely that your antenna will survive anyway (or the protection will cost more than the antenna itself). Static electricity which is formed in the antenna during storms represents the greater danger to the radio in practice. ...


2

While I completely agree with Phil on everything he wrote, antennas are not the only path to your equipment from a lightning strike. According to the map of Estimated Effective Ground Conductivity in the United States, I enjoy the privilege of living in a rural area with 0.5mS/m of ground conductivity - the lowest value on the map. Low conductivity means ...


1

As a licensee, you are being trusted to use your best judgement of the situation. Do you need to lock up your station? If you look at the FCC enforcement actions in http://transition.fcc.gov/eb/AmateurActions/ you will notice that most of the actions are warnings. I would think that if you had children, and your child was found talking on the radio ...


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