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2

First thing to do is determine the EMI source(s). Chargers for mobile devices, LED room lighting, and/or rooftop solar panels, etc., can easily generate a noise floor above that of your workstation. Neighbors can generate EMI closer to your antenna(s) than your office. I cut the main circuit breaker to my house, and turned things on one at a time to find ...


4

The frequencies your neighbor would be transmitting are different than the ones your own communications would use. They should not interfere with your utilities. Occasionally, funny things like old metal connections can end up re-broadcasting related frequencies instead of the original one, but this is usually accounted for as well when the allocations are ...


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No, this will affect nothing. Otherwise, the neighbor would not have gotten the right to operate these antennas.


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I believe my problem is created by common-mode noise. I redesigned my homemade SA612 mixer. I isolated the antenna ground from the mixer ground, and I also isolated the mixer ground from the output RTL-SDR ground, and now the problem is fixed. Here's how I solved the problem. Since I only have very limited knowledge of electronics and radio, it may contain ...


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It looks to me like you've put a lot of effort into tracking this down. I believe you are on the right track as far as the Pi creating a lot of broadband noise. But I'm wondering if you've tried putting the SDR on a extension USB cable so that you can move it as far from the Pi as possible? I've found that getting farther from a noise source helps a lot. ...


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