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36

Could be, but likely not. In particular, almost no amateur radio station would be operating continuously, so if you have a problem that is not intermittent, that's unlikely to be the source of it. (If you edit your question to specify what type of internet access ('cable', DSL, microwave link…) you have, and include a picture of the antenna, we can make a ...


14

First, I'd be sure it's actually the antenna picking up the noise, and not something else. If you don't have a balun on that dipole, probably your feedline is picking up all the noise in your house. Any other wires attached to your receiver can also make good noise antennas, especially the power cord, which is attached to your home's wiring, and coupled to ...


13

A "ham radio" is typically a transmit/receive system that uses certain frequencies set aside for radio amateurs to communicate with other enthusiasts. If there is a big antenna on your neighbor's roof, he/she is likely enthusiastic and quite knowledgeable in the area of radio interference; I am going to guess he/she would be happy to help you troubleshoot. ...


12

You may be surprised to hear this, but the antenna you describe isn't actually a vertical, but a dipole. One half of the dipole is the IMax-2000, and the other half is your feedline. You can not simply not have radials and still have an antenna. An antenna works by making EM fields between two things. A dipole has two halves. A vertical works because the ...


12

HF propagation is not only limited by manmade interference but also by natural phenomena like sunstorms. Anyway, I'd account that to social and technological reasons: HF activity suffers very much from the old men's club's image phenomenon (a term that I just invented!): How attractive is it to join a communication group that consists of old men? Old men ...


11

Having Ethernet and your antenna co-located is not an ideal situation. But then most amateur antenna situations involve compromises. The general idea of the following recommendations is to take as many precautions as practical to minimize the interference possibilities. I recommend that your Ethernet cable to your WAP be a CAT6 shielded cable (STP). While ...


9

Some older GFCI circuits were known to be susceptible to stray RF. The ARRL recommends replacing these older breakers with new ones that they have listed at the link I provided.


9

Wikipedia writes to say By the regulation, the FCC DoC certification mark is mandatory for devices classified under part 15 (IT equipment like computers, switched-mode power supplies, monitors etc., television receivers, cable system devices, low-power transmitters, un-licensed personal communication devices) and part 18 (industrial, scientific, and ...


9

A HF transmitter can interfere with a DSL service if the conditions are right simply by inducing more RF on the drop wire then the DSL modem (Which always cheap out on front end electronics) can cope with. Been there with my own DSL service when running a few hundred watts on 20M, suitable ferrite rings on the power and data wiring can sometimes help, but ...


9

Yes, very strong radio signals can be picked up by just about any device with a speaker and a transistor in it. The transistor acts as a rectifier, forming a crude envelope detector. Amplitude modulated voice can be heard quite clearly, single-sideband modulated voice is quite garbled but often still somewhat intelligible. No cause for alarm: it won't ...


8

Well, mostly no but yes it is possible for the antenna to have an effect. No. I get more interference from wifi than interference to wifi. In the computer adjacent to my ham station, I have had lockups but the network does not drop. It is not wifi related. I assume the lockups are from RF entering on a supposedly shielded cable like a USB mouse or ...


8

One way to tell is by its effects. Do you hear a garbled version of yourself in nearby speakers when you transmit SSB? Do GFCI outlets pop even though no one is being electrocuted? Does handling the transmission line give you RF burns when transmitting, or change what you hear when receiving? If you had these problems and now you don't, you must have been ...


8

The station would not really transmit static but rather white (or perhaps pink) noise. This would sound like static but as the observer tunes across the transmitter's frequency, the static would increase notably in volume (assuming amplitude modulation) and decrease again as the transmitting bandwidth is passed. Any signal strength indicator on the receiver, ...


7

Here is an assortment of common ideas and recommendations for RTL-SDR devices: Mount the device directly on your antenna, or otherwise minimize the amount of feed line used. (This does not directly remove noise but rather increases signal, but that's just as good if not better. It may also remove noise by moving the device further from your computer ...


7

Actually, depending on the power of the station, it could very well cause problems with any electronic equipment. I ran into a situation once where a band I supplied the sound system for had constant interference when playing one particular club. One night I was so bad we were actually getting the Ham's entire conversation through the PA. We powered down ...


7

Before looking for reasons why HF activity "appears to be declining", we should look for evidence that HF activity is declining — so let's look at some available sources of data. While contests may not be fully representative of the broader HF community, they do involve a lot of people, and they provide a ready source of reliable data that goes further back ...


7

There was a similar problem in the US a few years ago and it turned out to be a new shop sign that had a defective ballast that emitted a wide RF spectrum. Most key fob systems operate at frequencies of 315 MHz for North American made cars and 433.92 MHz for all others. The direction finding equipment would involve a programmable receiver or a portable ...


7

This is very likely to be be due to overload of the receiver. A quick, rough way to tell the difference: Tune your SDR receiver so the waterfall center frequency is not the same as the transmitter's frequency. Transmit. Check whether the spurs you see are symmetric about the transmitter's frequency or the receiver's frequency. This tells you which side ...


6

It's true, some GFCIs are just abnormally fussy, and you can attenuate RF on a conductor with ferrites. However, a lot of amateur setups have improperly designed or installed antennas. Common-mode RF currents in the antenna feed system will travel right down the feedline, to your transmitter, down its power cord, and into every other device in your house ...


6

A receiver's objective is to take some message which has had noise added to it, and recover from that the original message. Receivers need to do this even in the absence of jammers since natural sources add noise all the time. Jammers just add more of it. In this sense, a jammer can't be "jammed". The jammer does not have the objective of recovering a ...


6

I'm a tier 3 network support tech at a major Canadian ISP. Ham radio interference is a disturber our systems actually specifically check for, in relation to ADSL2+ and VDSL signals, and I've seen cases where line errors appear to have been caused by the client's own antenna. It's possible that whoever you're talking to for tech support has access to similar ...


6

I'd speculate a large part of the justification is that amateur stations, unlike commercial broadcast stations, are not periodically certified to meet spurious emission regulations. Or any regulations at all. While the station operator is responsible for ensuring the proper operation of his or her station, realistically amateurs will not always have the ...


6

Some troubleshooting ideas: Check your radio's power supply for noise by substituting a battery and disconnecting the PS from the wall. Run your receiver on a battery and turn off your main breaker. Make sure any battery powered computers/tablets are fully powered off. If the noise reduces, turn off all branch breakers, turn the main breaker back on, and ...


6

Loops (active or passive) don't have the RFI rejection capabilities they are often claimed to have. RFI is electromagnetic radiation just like the signal, and it's not possible to design an antenna which accepts one but not the other. See Can I reduce RFI/noise at the antenna? Loops have the same directionality as a dipole, however their polarization is ...


5

To answer your first question, yes, it will affect the signal, but it's a good thing. What you do to (RF) ground your antenna(s) depends on what type of antenna you are using. For instance, dipoles do not require a ground. Typical vertical antennas do require a graound though some types such as the GAP Challenger use 3 wires insulated from ground (in this ...


5

DCS (aka DSQ/DPL) provides a slightly larger range of codes to pick from compared to CTCSS. This means less chance that a nearby station will accidentally overlap with yours. Specifically, DCS gives you 83 codes, whereas CTCSS gives you somewhere between 26-50 squelch tones depending on the radio -- manufacturers have added extra codes over time. For ...


5

If your car uses petrol (gasoline) rather than diesel, then the ignition system can potentially generate a lot of noise because of the high-voltage system used to generate the sparks that ignite the fuel. Electric motors such as those used in the windscreen washer pump and/or wipers (or electric windows, etc.), can also generate noise. This would mean that ...


5

Short answer: Based on your description of the scenario, it's possible, but seemingly unlikely, that interference received from the ham radio is causing your problems. Longer answer: Kevin's answer is good (especially his recommendation to talk to your neighbor and get his input,) but I just wanted to add a few things regarding the technical aspects ...


5

There are many articles which describe how to use a R-Pi to emit (=transmit) a signal. However what most, if not all, articles fail to describe is that this signal is a very rough signal, usually not even a sinus, and has harmonics. It is these harmonics (=spurious emissions) which can cause interference to a whole range of services and devices when not ...


5

You are observing a practical example of harmonics. Harmonics of a Square Wave You do not mention how you are generating the signal with your Pi but it probably uses a simple square wave generator. Square waves have the characteristic that in addition to the fundamental frequency (the frequency that is being directly generated by the program in your Pi) ...


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