6

You don't say where you are hearing the Morse code. You say "on the same channels", but don't specify where you are listening. If you send Morse code using a buzzer, then that generates an audio tone. As with any audio, that can be sent over AM, FM, SSB or any other mode that can send audio. It is quite common for Morse code to be sent as an audio ...


5

That looks like you're strongly overdriving your receiver. Drastically reduce gain. This signal might not come from 137.5 MHz at all but be mixed there by the nonlinear effect of overdriving your amplifiers. The fact you can receive FM (a different signal at a different frequency) doesn't mean the gain is appropriate for this signal. Also, FM, being FM, is ...


4

There is a lot you haven't told us about the current situation that could be helpful. Since your dad lives so close, perhaps you can make various substitutions to identify the problem. For example, what do you hear from the speaker or headphone jack of the TS-450S when using your station antenna? If you hear nothing, then you should expect to see nothing on ...


4

There are a couple of options. If your phone supports WiFi calling and your provider allows it, I strongly recommend getting WiFi in the shack if you don’t have it already. If you don’t have it, and that’s because you’re remote, get a LTE<->WiFi router with SMA connectors and an appropriate antenna. If you can’t use this solution you can buy cell phone ...


4

Look around your neighbourhood or Google satellite imagery for new solar panel installations. We recently discovered a solar panel installation with noisy regulators creating noise at a neighbours house. Also as you mentioned that LED lights are also creating noise. Look for new street lamp installation nearby that is using the new LED replacement lamps.


3

Yes, in the early spark days, the fundamental frequency of the transmitter was largely determined by the self-resonance of the antenna system. Any sort of spark generator naturally generates RF energy at many frequencies, but those close the self-resonance of the antenna would be more likely to be effectively radiated. Receiving antenna self-resonance isn't ...


3

The genuine Sony Walkman, and most of the Walkman-style radios from other makers, did indeed use the headphone cable for their antenna. My experience (with an early 1980s Sony model) was very good on FM, and even then AM was mostly talk, news, and sports, so I didn't listen much on that band. That said, AM radio isn't what it used to be. Fewer stations ...


3

Put a dipole in the highest trees you can manage. The higher you get it, the better the performance will be. For good DX performance it should be at least 1/4 wavelength high. The trees will not significantly affect the performance. It is hard to beat a dipole on price, performance, or simplicity, especially when you already have these wonderful trees to ...


2

Well, it's a combination of two features: The squelch setting, and the busy channel lockout setting. Namely, when a sufficiently strong signal has been received, the squelch system will activate the audio part of the receiver, and allow you to hear transmission. Many radios also have more or less complicated busy channel lockout feature, which prevents the ...


2

Although what you heard was keyed audio transmitted by FM, you can often hear Morse sent by keying a carrier (OK, Hams call it "CW"), with an FM receiver. It usually requires a relatively strong signal, however. The receiver goes into "full quieting" during the carrier "on" time, & returns to background "hiss"...


2

Morse Code is a timed on-off signaling method that is not restricted to CW radio, as it was invented decades before Maxwell hypothesized the existence of radio waves. Morse Code can be used for communicating with clicking relays, buzzers, flashlights, mirrors, eye blinks, printed text, flag waving, Zoom, one or more sound channels of a highly encoded ATSC ...


2

QRM is extremely common nowadays due to a great increase in switch-mode power supplies that tend to desensitize nearby receivers, hence the reason why many Hams put up a shack away from the house. Simply because there isn't noise on the exact frequency you're on, doesn't mean you're not experiencing interference. You might want to try a band pass filter for ...


2

You might consider an RF choke at the interface between your radio and feed line. The choke at the feed point will help prevent common mode current reflecting from the antenna... but the outside of the shield can still be a source of noise on receive if it's not also choked at the receiver. In fact, you might test what happens when you put a dummy load at ...


2

If the RF noise is that strong, then you should be able to pick it up with a much smaller movable antenna. Even scrap wire or conductive tape on a large cardboard box. That may allow you to build small directional antennas (tiny loop and stub dipole) to determine if the noise is stronger from some specific directions, or a polarized antenna to determine ...


2

Start by trying to determine if the noise is "conducted" or "radiated" into your receiver. Basically, "conducted" noise gets into your receiver from the power supply or a ground wire or some other cable. "Radiated" noise gets in via the antenna. Start by powering your radio with a battery instead of the mains-powered ...


2

I'd suggest trying a different time of day, a different radio, a different antenna, and a different location; not necessarily all at the same time though. There's probably nothing wrong with your antenna, but you might get different results at different heights, or if you raise the height of the ends to the same height as the middle. Have you tested the ...


2

Atmospheric noise does not go as high as 28MHz, it becomes less dominant above 10MHz, see figure: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_noise At 28MHz it is the thermal noise of the earth, either directly picked by the antenna or coming from further and reflected. Thermal noise formula: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noise_temperature


2

If you are checking the correct frequencies (162.400 MHz, 162.425 MHz, 162.450 MHz, 162.475 MHz, 162.500 MHz, 162.525 MHz, 162.550 MHz), have all settings properly set (ex. volume control), and have a decent antenna installed and can't hear anything, then the NOAA signal entering your radio is simply too weak. Try holding the MONI button for each frequency ...


2

A tunable high-Q loop antenna, such as: https://www.amazon.com/Kaito-Tunable-Passive-Antenna-Panasonic/dp/B001KC579Q/ placed near your small AM radio can inductively couple into the internal ferrite antenna or RF front-end, and add to their gain. Here's an example of one built around a crate than you can put your radio inside: https://swling.com/blog/...


2

I would recommend getting a multi band radio that can receive these and other frequencies. In the late 1980s I used to listen to AM radio using an old FRG-7 communications receiver. I loved that thing - it was a joy to use. Even its power switch was big and red, just like they should be! The only problem with that was that it worked best with a large ...


1

A dipole is resonant on every frequency where it is an odd multiple of (slightly less than) $\lambda/2$. So normally we talk of half-wave dipoles, but 1.5-wave, 2.5 wave, and 3.5-wave dipoles are similarly resonant. They all have a feedpoint impedance of about (72+0j) ohms in free space. For monopoles, being half a dipole, the resonances occur at (slightly ...


1

You've received several good answers here. To Brian's answer suggesting that you should try powering it from a battery, I would add start with your own house before running around the neighborhood with a radio by turning off your main circuit breaker. This will determine whether or not the RFI is coming from something in your house, which is quite likely. ...


1

I have been astonished by the receive-only performance of the Shared-Apex Loop Array (SALA) that I have used at a friend's contest station: Unlike a beverage, which I believe will run out of gas at 20 meters, the SALA works well from 160 through 20. The SALA also takes up a lot less room than a beverage and erecting an orthogonal pair allows the receive ...


1

I am really going to echo what @pappad said. Get a large 12V battery and connect to your radio. Turn all the power off in the house - and check you can hear the stations on FT8/CW etc. This will be the quietest your environment can be. But if you are not hearing anything at this stage (note I am saying hearing... not visualising on a PC screen) then there ...


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