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17

"QRM" is one of many Q-codes used as abbreviations in radio communication. "QRM" in particular refers to human-generated interference (as opposed to "QRN" which is used to refer to atmospheric noise). "QSB" refers to fading (variation in signal strength over time). The codes originated from the desire to keep CW (morse code) transmissions as brief as ...


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I keep these "Q" signals in line with this : QRN is "N"atural band noise ( lightning ) QRM is "M"an-made band noise ( crowded signals ) QSB is "B"utterfly effect from Ionosphere in-stability.


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Deepness of QSB refers to the magnitude of fading. A very deep fade-out can make the received signal so weak that it becomes unreadable. A shallow fade-out would be one where the signal level drops only slightly, not affecting readability. Radio propagation conditions often change quite quickly over time. For example, QSB might start in the middle of a ...


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That was a Morse code message, using common abbreviations to save time. Here it is translated into plain language: [CQ=] Calling any station, [de=] from radio station KYHP. [QTC?=] How many telegrams have you to send? [K=] Go ahead, I'm listening. The first letter K means that the station was a US station; however, it may or may not have actually been ...


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There is basically three (somewhat overlapping) lists of Q-codes used in Ham Radio. The three lists are those used by voice operators (SSB), those used by CW operators, and those used in CW traffic handling nets (QN codes). A full single "official" list of Q-codes is not useful to the ham radio operator. What is useful is to know those that are commonly ...


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Wikipedia explains this with a second option for QSD. Is my keying defective? [AP13] or Are my signals mutilated? [AP14] So essentially it means, is your keying having some kind of an issue. This could be the result of a defective keyer. Essentially it means is there something going on that's cutting off the signal?


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Back in the day, it wasn't uncommon for the key to directly switch the transmitter. Transistors didn't exist, and why would you use a relay when you already have a perfectly good switch under your fingers? Also back in the day, it wasn't uncommon to transmit with a whole ton of power. Building a bigger transmitter is technologically less challenging than ...


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