11

For shortwave listening, it doesn't really matter – all these connectors are suitable for 30 MHz, and for reception you don't need to work with significant power. PL-259 2m-band If you, however, plan to work in the 2m band (2m being the wavelength, so frequency is, $f=\frac c\lambda=\frac{3\cdot10^8\,\frac{\text m}{\text s}}{2\,\text{m}}=150\,\text{MHz}$), ...


8

Our friends in the UK and other parts of the world are now wondering how you could even begin to solder a PL259 connector with a torch (aka flashlight)! But in their vernacular, you of course are referring to a burning torch. In general, when you heat a metallic object with the hopes of applying solder, the heat will cause oxidation to form on the metallic ...


7

UHF connectors are tricky, because they're not a very good connector by modern standards to begin. They have only a few redeeming qualities: They are common on amateur radio equipment The socket can accommodate a banana plug Due to their non-constant impedance design, an unavoidable consequence of being designed so long ago, they don't work well above 30 ...


6

I'm not sure what you mean by "M" type, but here are some points to address your question. Pros: Well understood, and very old, design that most know how to work with; Numerous vendors continue to manufacture various connector topologies with the 'UHF Connector' specifications. Note the PL-259 & SO-239 are but two examples of many compatible part ...


6

The NEC defines "listed" as: Listed. Equipment, materials, or services included in a list published by an organization that is acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction and concerned with evaluation of products or services, that maintains periodic inspection of production of listed equipment or materials or periodic evaluation of services, ...


5

I've often used a propane torch to quickly preheat PL259s, but seldom for the actual soldering. Once the connector is preheated, it is a quick and simple matter to flow solder into the holes and the pre-tinned braid using a 50 watt soldering iron. (These days I use a Steinl heat gun instead of the torch flame for preheating, as it gives much better control ...


4

So, what your measurement indicates is two things: yep, the thing is somehow connected. The deep dips in the return loss are points when the characteristic impedance of the connector+cable+connector+termination look like the source impedance of the VNA yep, it's a terrible non-constant complex impedance seen from the perspective of the VNA that's everything ...


3

If the problem is only that “SO-239 connectors” and “listed” can't be found together but can be found separately, then you should consider using a different connector — SO-239/PL-259/“UHF” is an old design that remains in use by amateurs, but doesn't have much of a market outside that. Notably, the N connector is the same physical size (even using the same ...


3

The "UHF" connector, as stated, is a hold-over from World War II, and has become an industry standard. A lot of hams "know" how to put them on coax, and, since radio is, overall, forgiving, most don't notice the folly of their installation processes (melted dielectric, poor solder wetting, etc). Me? I can install them, but prefer to crimp them on. That, ...


2

Following up on Phil's comment, there is a decent cutaway view: Pomona Model 73059 UHF Plug, Clamp Type, RG 8 (mouser.com) Excerpt:


2

For temporary weatherproofing my coax connectors I use a piece of bicycle innertube and a few cable ties.


2

For temporary connections, there's small "clamp on" cable boxes, something like: Definitely not "condensation-proof", but "should reduce quite significantly". Other than that, there's people that swear by the powers of the flexible LIDL or Aldi plastic radome, i.e. a plastic bag fastened with rubber bands or whatever around the parts to be protected. I can ...


2

The average power rating is determined by overheating of the centre contact and is a function of frequency, as heating depends on the resistive insertion loss. Typical makers curves for a new clean connector with a perfect load such as page 275 of [2] for example imply ~5000 watts at 20 MHz and ~500watts at 2 GHz, i.e. a square root frequency ...


1

Per Hobbs-KC2G's comment, you should now try and vary your load resistance, as your load might not equal the impedance of your coax. The procedure below will tell you if that is the case or not. One way of doing this to to solder a small non-inductive 50 ohm resistor directly to the far end of the coax. Cut the leads just short enough to solder them to the ...


1

Your are rightly concerned about dew infiltrating the connector. This can cause corrosion over time and moisture can build up to the point that short circuits result. But, if you only leave the antenna outdoors for a day or two at a time and not in the rain, it's unlikely you need very much moisture protection. I treat the threads of all PL259/SO239 ...


1

The short answer is yes, both shields must be connected together. Many other connectors for this already connect the shields for you, providing that you follow the instructions. N connectors (at least the ones I've used) do. The snap-and-seal crimp connectors for my RG-6 (that's all that I use outdoors anymore) does this also.


1

I’ve never had to preheat. Pre-tinning the wire and using the appropriate wattage iron or gun has always worked. That and liquid flux. I’ve used swedging irons as well as guns. 60 watt isn’t too much. Once you tin and flux it shouldn’t be that difficult. I was taught in an Air Force tech school and torches just aren’t an option. Consider the melting ...


1

The torch method seems prone to problems as you can't control the heat all that well. Even silver-teflon connectors have their limits. I've had good success using the old solder gun, much more heat available than most solder irons. A Metcal iron with the right tip would probably work well also. I just used an SP-200 with broad chisel tip to solder ...


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