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5

"If the report never changes, why do contest rules still require signal reports, when cutting out phony reports would speed things up?" This question comes up frequently, among contesters (e.g. on CQ-Contest, an email reflector for contesters) as well as among those who criticise contests. Reasons for the signal report often include (in no ...


5

Signal reports are sent because the contest may require them. Every contest I can think of requires some exchange of information, and a signal report may or may not be among the required information. For example, the ARRL 10 meter contest specifies signal reports must be exchanged: 4. Contest Exchange: 4.1. W/VE stations (including Hawaii and Alaska) send ...


4

Frequency and wavelength of a wave are related: the frequency times the wavelength equals the speed of the wave, in this case the speed of light. For HF, the frequency in megahertz times the wavelength in meters equals 300. Modern radios display the frequency. Bands are referred to by their approximate wavelength for historical reasons. If the frequency ...


2

If you are a new ham, you need to go to the https://arrl.org web site and get a listing of the ham bands that they publish. You can find them on their site by searching for ham bands. Print out one of the listings; the 8.5 by 11 inch chart is in color. They also have some that are able to be printed in black and white. On those charts, it lists that you with ...


2

The RS(T) reporting system has always been arbitrary. The original intent was for the receiving operator to estimate readability, signal strength, and tone by ear; there never have been universally-recognized standards regarding what should be R5 or S9. Manufacturers muddied the waters somewhat by putting S-meters in receivers, with S9 set as -73 dBm, ...


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