9

Marcel Wallace founded Panoramic Radio Corp. and details his "Panoramic radio receiving system" in patent US2279151A (1938). Page 2, column 1, line 19 of the patent gives us a clue as to how the physical "panoramic" concept made its way into what we now consider to be a purely electrical phenomenon: ...provide a panoramic radio compass system having ...


8

Receivers and transmitters are still separated today, they are just in the same box. There is still a T/R switch too, integrated in the box. In many radios, it's a relay, same as they have been for decades. Relays are hard to beat for isolation and maximum power ratings. Their downside is relatively slow speed, which prevents really good QSK operation. They ...


7

It's probably an ionosonde — sending out HF radio signals not to communicate but to measure the reflections and thereby determine the current characteristics of the ionosphere. The signal is probably not actually a series of brief transmissions, but a continuous chirp transmission with continuously increasing frequency. Two reasons: As far as I know, this ...


5

A panadapter is a device that adapts the narrow (typically 4kHz) bandwidth of a traditional receiver into a much wider bandwidth, perhaps the entire band. The pan- prefix means all, as in panoramic, pandemic, or Pangaea. A waterfall display isn't a panadapter, though a panadapter may have a waterfall display built in. A spectrum analyzer can also make a ...


4

I don't know what the specific devices you're referring to do, but a couple of things are all technically possible without great effort: the ADC that is used to calculate the waterfall in receive-only mode is still connected to the antenna, maybe with additional physical attenuation (which you could trivially reverse in digital domain by multiplication with ...


3

The radio has multiple antenna ports and full-duplex capability, and the operator has selected different antennas for transmit and receive. Or, The radio just displays the transmit spectrum on the waterfall, and it isn't coming from the antenna at all. I've used radios with both of those options, so they're both definite possibilities.


2

Is a panadapter hardware or software? If you use a hardware spectrum analyzer and a scope, it's hardware. If the panadapter is based on an SDR, then it requires both the SDR hardware and software. The difference between a waterfall and a panadapter is that the waterfall shows the spectrum analysis of a range of frequencies over time, which may include ...


2

"Panorama, an unobstructed and wide view of an extensive area in all directions." A "panoramic adapter" for implementing a "wide view" of the radio spectrum is abbreviated as "panadapter".


2

What you are seeing there is the frequency response of your receiver's audio stage (or possibly even the input of your computer's sound card). It is amplifying frequencies around 300Hz and 2500Hz much more strongly than it is amplifying frequencies less than 100Hz, and those between 800Hz and 1700Hz. It's clear on both those screenshots, even though you are (...


2

Often, the source of bands of noise in an SDR spectrum is locally generated RFI or EMI. During a neighborhood power outage, one might notice a large number of these bands disappear. Sharper bands in the waterfall can sometimes be mitigated by reducing or choking EMI sources in your "shack". Other possible sources for these bands can be ripple in passband ...


2

As far as your question regards components: T/R switching is usually done with either relays, reed relays (often faster than other types of relays; also more quiet), or PIN diodes (even more quiet and faster). Where high voltages and/or currents are present (and fast switching is needed) vacuum relays are also used. Circuitry may involve circuits that ensure ...


2

As both previous answers mention, the T/R switch functionality is just something that moved into existing boxes, not something that disappeared. The only ways to make that functionalies disappear would be making the receive end tolerant of the transmit power and still a sensitive receiver (practically impossible at any significant power – the difference ...


1

I havent looked into the mechanics too deep, but FlexRadio has a full-duplex feature for those models with 2 SCUs (spectral capture units) in the radio. Each SCU goes off to a different antenna, and as long as antenna separation and monitoring (or precalculating) dbm levels happens, it works well. I dont believe however you can do full duplex on the same ...


1

Does the deviation from the center frequency depend on the frequency of the audio/information signal applied to the carrier? No. In FM terminology, the "deviation" is chosen by the designer (or mandated by regulation) and determines the amount by which the carrier itself is modulated at the "peaks" of the input signal. For example, if the deviation is 2.5 ...


1

It may help to see the display of the demodulated, baseband output spectrum produced by an SDR (below).


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