6

Per this document: Larry E. Price W4RA, the IARU president in 2002, requesting the definitive ITU zone definitions - wrote: You have to keep in mind that the ITU has one administrative purpose for having zones that has nothing at all to do with amateur radio. However, various amateur radio organizations decided to have both awards and operating ...


5

Some googling for "ionosonde operation" reveals some applications (for example) to the FCC to operate under 47 C.F.R. ยงยง 5.3(c) and (e) which details that "Stations operating in the Experimental Radio Service will be permitted to conduct the following type of operations". So it seems that ionosondes in the US are governed by the FCC rules ...


3

Both are a means of identifying where you are in the world. CQ Zones is managed by CQ Magazine, and the ITU Zones are managed by the ITU. You can see more information about how they are defined in the two questions you linked. Some contests use them as an identifier of where you are, the most notable being the ITU number used in the IARU competition in July, ...


3

Many contests use them as a convenient measure of how many different "regions" you've managed to contact. Since using countries as a contest multiplier isn't necessarily very accurate (within a certain radius, US can only easily reach Canada or Mexico or ocean, within the same radius, a station in central Europe could easily have their first 20 contacts come ...


3

I found this reference table on the ITU site: http://www.itu.int/ITU-R/terrestrial/broadcast/hf/refdata/reftables/ciraf.txt That appears to lay out lat/long coordinates for the points outlining the zones. It's linked to from this page titled "Reference Data": http://www.itu.int/ITU-R/terrestrial/broadcast/hf/refdata/index.html


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