19

My two favorite locations for listening online are: http://websdr.org/ WebSDR was first conceived as a means to make the 25 m radio telescope at Dwingeloo available to many radio amateurs for EME reception. In order to test a preliminary version of the software without using the 25m dish, a shortwave WebSDR was set up on Christmas Eve 2007 at the radio ...


8

I use the WA7BNM Contest Calendar, usually the 8 Day version is enough for me, I can't plan much farther in advance. This one is nice with links to the rules and such so I check it regularly. There is also the ARRL Contest Calendar, it usually only has the ARRL sponsored contests though. And there is always the handy 3830 Scores site for the post contest ...


8

Well, mostly no but yes it is possible for the antenna to have an effect. No. I get more interference from wifi than interference to wifi. In the computer adjacent to my ham station, I have had lockups but the network does not drop. It is not wifi related. I assume the lockups are from RF entering on a supposedly shielded cable like a USB mouse or ...


7

The Hinternet is the "ham internet". In the US, and likely in other countries also, several WiFi channels fall into the 13cm ham band; being in the ham band is advantageous because licensed hams can use higher power than non-licensed ISM (industrial, scientific, medical) band users. So the hinternet generally refers to hams using WiFi gear, often with ...


5

OpenWebRX is another way to monitor an SDR online. http://sdr.hu/openwebrx If you go to http://sdr.hu/ you can also see a list of receivers you can listen in to. (As to your other questions, those might be better split out. These days there exist many ways to handle the needs of a remote monitoring client written for the browser. I would guess both ...


4

The question specifies "SDR", but if all you want is to listen to signals in a distant location, you might try http://www.globaltuners.com/.


3

maximum rate There's no upper boundary really other than SNR. There's no general number. There's what information theorists call channel capacity, which simply relates the amount of bits per second you can get, at most, theoretically, across a channel of given bandwidth $B$ at given signal-to-noise ratio. The formula simply states $$C=B\log_2 \left(1+\text{...


3

To answer my own question: WebSDR seems to stream demodulated audio via using private (closed) API for control. A couple other possible solutions for streaming remote SDR data over the internet include: rtl_tcp : You can build your own remote SDR station with an RTL-SDR (or similar SDR) on a tiny server (Raspberry Pi 3, et.al.), and stream data over the ...


2

So far as I can tell, it's perfectly acceptable to use the Palmer IRLP node, but realize that it might not be connected all the time. It is probably a similar situation to the ISS, you just frequently won't get a response.


2

The PG7V HF Contest Calendar is also a nice one. In the meantime, I have put up a web page linking to all the calendars mentioned in these answers.


2

I am by no means an expert, but here's my point of view on this. Cellphones get their data by a Cell Tower, and if you have ever been on a plane there is little to no reception once you are in the air. The reason this happens is because the cell towers are horizontally directional so that they can get the most range from the smallest amount of power possible....


2

IMAP is a protocol for transferring email, nothing more, nothing less. It typically uses TCP/IP as the underlying protocol, but it could be routed over something else (like packet radio). If you wanted to, you could configure TCP/IP over AX.25 but I don't know if anyone else is doing it, so you'd probably need to run your own mailserver on the other end as ...


2

It happens slowly and organically. Yes, most of these folks have probably mentioned on bulletin boards, forums, or mailing lists that they have a new project they're working on. They aren't running around putting those notes in all the lists though. They're putting it on lists in which they're active members and in ways they think that community might like, ...


2

As the saying goes, if you build a better mousetrap, then the world will beat a path to your door; but in the modern era, you do need to get the word out first somehow. A website with complete information about your awesome kit is essential. That way, interested hams can find your site either directly from a URL, or from a search engine. Don't neglect the ...


2

The service I have heard of that simulates HF communications is HamSphere [Wikipedia article]. It is a paid service. I think there might be another similar site but that's all I remember.


1

How does a ham Internet gateway work? Someone, or often an amateur radio club, installs a radio at a site with internet access. From there, they upload the received signals to a network of servers on the internet, or host the server themselves. There are many such services. Here are a few, and by no means exhaustive: WebSDR (predominantly independent HF ...


1

How does a ham Internet gateway work? Check out http://websdr.org. All over the world, many amateur radio stations have connected software-defined-receivers (WebSDRs) to their computers, using software specifically designed for the purpose. Is it possible for someone to use that to listen for my transmissions (over the Internet without needing a ham radio)?...


1

Clearly not possible if you try to reach a certain altitude. Why? Because antennas of cell phones are made -by design- to "spread" the signal on a horizontal plan. If you are to high in the sky, you cannot listen, nor speak to cellular antennas. Turn your chance on VHF spectrum instead. No chance to make a world-around balloon with no repeater. Planes ...


1

While I'm not very experienced with packet radio (it's on my list of projects), I can comment in general on using IMAP on low-bandwidth connections. I have extensive experience using it on dial-up TCP/IP connections (PPP), which are much slower than modern broadband connections and have much higher latency. These are aspects it has in common with packet ...


1

I would go for the simplex option because there's no need to be able to TX at the same time as RXing if it's on a repeater.


1

On which bands are you going to operate? I regularly operate on HF bands (160-10 meters) and never have any interference with the WiFi signal. Except if you operate on microwaves (e.g., 13 cm band, which overlaps with the frequency range used by 802.11b/g/n), I would not expect any interference on the WiFi. However, there is something else to care about: ...


1

The not yet commercialised FlexRadio FLEX-6000 series is said to be going to offer OS-independent remote operation.


1

Ten-Tec Omni VII HF+6m Transceiver supports MS Windows. The remote GUI program can be downloaded here. I do not know about Mac OSX or GNU/Linux.


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