17

It very much depends on the two countries. In general, there are two large international groups with which operating within the same group is fairly easy. However, even for these two, if you move to another country you should get a license for that country. The two groups are (From ARRL): CEPT- Primarily European countries IARU- Primarily the Americas. Many ...


10

Yes, with some extra paperwork. ARRL has most of the rules for international operating. In the case of a US operator in the UK, you'd be operating under CEPT. You'd need to be an Extra - General licenses are recognized in some countries, but not in the UK. You'd also need proof of license and US citizenship, and a copy of the FCC official notice. Of course, ...


10

You're correct in your understanding about region: given that you're operating in a part of the US that is in Region 2 (there are a few US overseas territories in Region 3), you need to conform to the Region 2 band plan, and not any other. FCC regulation 97.301(b), concerning authorized frequencies, grants the same privileges to a CEPT (non-novice) license-...


6

As a UK license holder operating in the United States, you will be operating under CEPT Recommendation T/R 61-01. According to the CEPT regulations(PDF), it explicitly states that: The CEPT Licence permits utilisation of all frequency bands allocated to the Amateur Service and Amateur Satellite Service and authorised in the country where the amateur station ...


5

Some googling for "ionosonde operation" reveals some applications (for example) to the FCC to operate under 47 C.F.R. §§ 5.3(c) and (e) which details that "Stations operating in the Experimental Radio Service will be permitted to conduct the following type of operations". So it seems that ionosondes in the US are governed by the FCC rules ...


5

I hold an Amateur Extra licence from the United States and have moved to the United Kingdom. I sent an application to Ofcom for a Full reciprocal licence and received the following response. I can operate for three months for free, then £20 each six months for an indefinite length. I plan on arguing my case as the United States does not issue Harmonized ...


4

There are a few important things you will need to remember, which are mainly outlined here and here. I believe you must follow the power limits and band plans as outlined by the Polish government while operating there. Information will be hidden somewhere in here. Good luck with that. I believe your best bet would be to email some people on those pages and ...


4

if it is legal, or desirable Radio Amateurs may use any language which they can speak. I am not aware that there are any countries where the use of, or the not-use of, a particular language is stipulated in the license. But IANAL, and there are many countries. if it is legal, or desirable If the licensed Amateur wants to use his own native language, ...


4

India India has two classes of licenses - general and restricted. Getting the general license requires sending and receiving morse at 8 wpm. [Source][1] [1]: https://arsi.info/wpc-rules/#post-5:~:text=PART%20II%20%E2%80%93%20Morse%20(Only%20for,Morse%20reception%20and%20sending%20(8%20wpm)


3

Thailand For its own amateur radio licences, Thailand has three grades - Basic, Intermediate and Advanced. Basic allows access to the 2m VHF band only, and the higher two grades allow access to HF as well. The Intermediate and Advanced licences require a basic Morse code test, although it looks like it's very simple. However, Thai amateur radio licences are ...


3

It is ok. Hams may use any language they want if both sides agree to use it. If ham calls CQ in Arabic that is invitation to use that language in QSO.


3

Unfortunately, the best answer I can give you is "it depends". Whether you can use a license issued in one country in another country depends on whether those countries have signed a treaty allowing such use. The ARRL has some information, mainly useful to US amateurs, on their site. If you'd like help Googling for specific country pairs, you can use the ...


3

The short answer is YES you can operate in the UK if, 1) you hold an U.S. FCC ADVANCED or EXTRA class license. These two FCC license classes are recognized as a national (US) license that is equivalent to the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) Radio Amateur Radio license and can operate on all frequencies allocated ...


2

The UK is a signatory of European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) Recommendations T/R 61-01 or T/R 61-02. Unfortunately, the Radio Society of Great Britain's page Operating for Visitors is Under Constuction which is not very helpful :( However, there is some useful information of the OFCOM (the regulatory body) website ...


2

A CEPT license is valid in all CEPT signatory countries, and many such countries will take it as proof of having passed the relevant examinations and issue a local corresponding license on request. The CEPT license is meant for when you visit another country, however, so in and of itself probably won't be as good as a local license. A local license will ...


2

No. Amateur Radio license works only in the country where it is granted. However, certain countries have reciprocation agreements under which licensed operators from one country may operate in another country as long as they follow the regulations laid down in that country. While operating in a foreign country, the operator must identify him/erself as such ...


2

There was a bit of a kerfuffle last year over this very topic here in the states. See: Did the FCC just make Baofengs Illegal? While that is ongoing, I wasn't able to find any literature on Norway banning the Baofeng radios. However, even though they aren't part of the EU, they still require you to have a European Conference of Postal & ...


1

Russia There are four categories of amateur radio license in Russia. The first category gives you most privileges, including the possibility to use short callsing like R1AB. The exam for this category is most difficult and includes the test on receiving CW at ~12 WPM with Russian letters (that's a few additional symbols e.g. Ш is ----). Other categories don'...


1

In South Korea, CW must take the CW test in order to qualify for a possible grade (the practice has been abolished and only the written test is required).


1

This just in from Bjorn Myrvold, LB7ZG, at NRRL: Yes, you can bring your Baofeng UV82 transceiver and use it in Norway. Remember to use the prefix LA/.


1

I don't think anything specifically says that amateur radio transmissions are public and can be archived, and certainly nothing prohibits it, but if you read between the lines in the rules, this is implicit. You are not allowed to make a profit from amateur radio transmissions, so copyright enforcement would not make sense. You are not allowed to obscure ...


1

First of all Poland is a CEPT country, as is the US, so you can follow CEPT rules. CEPT rules require the following, per ARRL: Bring their original US license Bring proof of US citizenship (generally in the form of a Passport) Bring a copy of the FCC's Public Notice (this notice contains its information in three languages, English, French and German) which ...


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