6

This image of the bottom side of the bracket was taken with a flatbed scanner. The depicted dimensions were taken separately using a caliper, not by measuring on the image. The white inner area is the paper over an as-yet-unused adhesive pad; the material of the bracket is black-painted metal. Unprocessed image


5

For Question 1: As others have said, this does look like a PL-259/SO-239, commonly called a UHF Connector. Question 2: You can get wall mount adapters for these connections too, I'm not sure I can post links here, but search for "SO-239 wall plate". In the event you can't find this specific one, you could potentially use others, like the one in your ...


4

Two drawbacks to ignoring your grounding: You will have a poor(er) signal. You could become the ground and experience an RF burn first-hand. That said, VHF antennas are often not grounded - handhelds and VHF radios in cars, for example.


3

I think there might be confusion between RF ground, counterpoise, and electrical safety grounding. I am going to restrict my answer to RF ground (but, the word counterpoise is often used for the same thing). In a perfectly balanced antenna, such as a Dipole at its resonant frequency, there is no need for an RF ground since no current would flow to the RF ...


1

I have gone the simple route for most of my outdoor connectors in recent years. I use an inverted container over the connections and leave the bottom open. This fully waterproofs the connections without any concern of diurnal condensation build up. Inspections and alterations are very easily done. If I am concerned about connector corrosion, such as on a ...


1

Welcome to ham.SE, and congratulations on the new mobile rig. Alan K0BG has an excellent website that has everything you might need to know about installing a mobile radio and operating mobile. His page about wiring and grounding recommends drilling a new hole through the firewall, if there isn't a spare hole available, and using a rubber grommet to ...


1

Even though I have a 4-dr, space is limited for me as well. I only use radios with remote heads. Two heads are mounted up front with the microphone coming up from alongside my seat for one of them. I did drill holes for a Motorola Spectra head although some good double-sided tape would probably have worked. The Kenwood is attached to a spot on the dash with ...


1

Tim Seed, comment number two, is spot on. I used a standard Icom mobile mounting bracket, the MB-4, to mount the entire radio (the ID-880) down there in front of the gear shift, including leaving the control head right on the radio. The MB-4 merely tips the unit up to a nice viewing angle AND solves the problem that the radio will not quite fit in there ...


1

Sometimes doing the right mount means getting the right rig. I am not familiar with the rigs you plan to install but when I decided to install a mobile rig in my truck, I studied my options before buying the rig and made my decision on what fits best. In my case, it was two rigs: HF Transceiver and VHF/UHF FM Transceiver. I figured my favored ...


1

Yes this is possible. A standard car cigarette lighter socket is rated at up to 10A and 100W, so you have plenty of leeway. Another question when moving from one car to another, is what to do about an antenna.


1

The R7000 and 7000+ are NOT quarter wave verticals they are HALF wave verticals( check dimensions you'll see starting 10 meters that its not 8ft=quarter wave , its about 12-13 ft , shortened from 16ft because of the traps)., the spokes at the base are NOT radials they are Counterpoises, 3 feet distance is not enough above metal roof or even an AC unit(I ...


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