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Well, according to the spec tables in the manual the thing expects a 50 Ω antenna impedance. Mismatch means a loss of signal energy. How much exactly depends on the length of the 75 Ω transmission line – this makes a system much harder to design predictably. I wrote all the following (up to the next horizontal line), then stopped to wonder "what might ...


3

I think the problem you will run into is that people will want this to be plug and play. They may not have a directional coupler, or know or feel like to calibrate it and all that other stuff. Even if they do it, they may wonder if they did it right and if the reading will be accurate or not. I think you will need to handle this part in your design and ...


3

Take three 1/4 wave sections of 75 ohm coaxial cable (let's say RG11) and solder together. You now have a 1/4 wave section of 25 ohm. Doing the math (25 * 25) / 12.5 = 50 ohm. Now use any 50 ohm coxial cable length to the radio. Ps: don't forget to take into account the 75 ohm cable speed factor to calculate the 1/4 wave section. Good luck. Luiz PY4ACP


3

An antenna that's Pretty short (0.08 wavelength), Not tuned, Mag-mounted to an inadequate counterpoise, Indoors with who-knows-how-much metal in its near field, could certainly have a 5:1 or worse SWR, which is enough to "peg the needle" on most meters I've seen.


2

Smith chart shows that 50 Ohm antenna (assumed perfect 50 Ohm real!) connected to 75 Ohm coax cable can result in impedances between 50 and 112.5 Ohm. SWR 1: 1.5. So this so far not mentioned possible solution in this thread may be usefull for your problem: for a single frequency, or for a small frequency band, the use of cable with a multiple of half ...


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