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The instructions for your antenna kit say to start with a recommended length of wire for the antenna and a different recommended length for the counterpoise, and then decrease the length of the antenna wire by two to three inches (5 to 7.5 cm) until you have the best match, i.e. the LED is the dimmest at the minimum. What the instructions don't say is that ...


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Of course, the answer to this question is certainly "it depends." Yes, different antenna elements in close proximity can interact and cause interference problems. The most notable issue would be a degradation of both antennas. You don't want that. But you might not have a problem - again depending on what sort of antenna you wanted to put up, and ...


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Just using it as a support will definitely have some kind of interaction with your antenna, unpredictable but empirically measurable. BTW, my first thought is that you can try to take advantage of that TV antenna as a capacitive load at the end of your EFHW (make sure to disconnect the TV antenna from any feed line of its own though). Using it like this will ...


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A tuned antenna should result in a real load impedance for your transceiver. This impedance can deviate from 50 Ohm, resulting in an SWR deviating from 1:1. The EFHW antenna impedance can be as high as 1500 Ohm and can only be connected to the TX when there is a transformer at the feedpoint of the antenna; the base I assume. Without a transformer (common 1:5 ...


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The frequencies in your pasted image of a table are in kilohertz (kHz). These days frequencies are more often expressed in megahertz or gigahertz (MHz or GHz). Anyway, frequencies ranging from 3560 kHz, also known as 3.56 MHz, to 15.245 MHz are in the high-frequency (HF) band, also commonly called "shortwave", rather than the very-high-frequency (...


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