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2

See http://www.leapsecond.com/museum/fei5650a/FE5650A-pin-out.gif for the pin out of option 58. http://www.leapsecond.com/museum/fei5650a/ supplies more detail.


0

The datasheet that I found online has a picture of what looks like an F-connector on the same side as the multi-pin connector. That's where your output should be.


4

The ARRL has a good FAQ page about the 60 meter band. The special rules in the United States for the 60 meter band aren't due to any technical limitations. Instead, they're a compromise to allow amateur use of the band without interfering with government use. The primary users of the band are government agencies, and they were using it long before ...


2

You might want to look in the manual of your radio. A lot of radios can be set up to tune in 6.25kHz steps, allowing you to tune to frequencies which are in between the frequencies you can tune to with the default 5kHz steps. I don't have the same model radio so I can't verify this would allow you to tune to the frequency you want exactly, but it might be ...


1

Jefferey, this is a very easy question to answer, and the answer is no. The Wallops Island telemetry transmitter is probably going to be a narrow band FM signal, and 5 kHz off is too far to be able to hear it on your Bofeng receiver which is also a narrow band receiver. You would normally need to be within 1 - 3 kHz of the frequency to hear it properly. ...


0

That's a frequency error of about 10 parts per million. That is very much in the order of frequency uncertainty of your handheld's oscillator, anyway! As different oscillators not being exactly the same is a problem for every radio communication, every communication standard is built in a way that allows for a receiver to deal with small frequency errors. "...


3

These are just conventions. Back in the day of wavelengths determining the band you are in, the “highest” (i.e. the longest wavelength) band was the 160m band. This is of course not true any more, with many countries having access to bands with much longer wavelengths. But the 160m band is still known as “top band”. Since then, it has become the convention ...


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