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7

I don't know Europe's regulations, but in the US under the FCC's jurisdiction, the onus is on the station operator to prevent unauthorized transmissions. An unlicensed individual using APRS on the internet wouldn't be violating any regulation, but the station operator who allows her station to make prohibited transmissions via the internet would be. ...


4

When you send something to APRS, even via Internet, it eventually may end up retransmitted on ham radio frequencies. Thus, you are not allowed to use the system if you do not have valid amateur radio license. APRS network requires you to identify using ham radio call sign which you have only if you have valid license.


4

After reading the various online sources, it looks like the answer to your question is no. US amateurs can operate in CEPT countries, but a requirement is that they be US citizens. Your user name suggests that you hold a licence in Argentina, but sadly Argentina is not a party to the CEPT agreements. If your visit is only for a few days, it might not be ...


4

The 1750 tone burst is widely used in European the same way that CTCSS/PL and DCS is used for repeater access in the US. I used tone burst exclusively when living in Germany. Tone burst never caught on in the US.


4

There are a few important things you will need to remember, which are mainly outlined here and here. I believe you must follow the power limits and band plans as outlined by the Polish government while operating there. Information will be hidden somewhere in here. Good luck with that. I believe your best bet would be to email some people on those pages and ...


4

I don't have the full answer, but I hope I can give you some pointers on where to search. If you get a HAREC (Harmonised Amateur Radio Examination Certificate) license in any country that complies with HAREC, i.e, the license test covers a certain set of topics, you should be able to transfer the license to another country. Most European countries are in ...


3

The device usually doesn't have anything to do with legality, it's what you do. So, rule of thumb: Without a license, you can't transmit – full stop. I'm not quite sure about federal Swiss law, but chances are you can only receive broadcast transmissions (meant for everyone to receive) and transmissions especially meant for you, and everything else is ...


3

You have a few choices in the ISM bands: 433mhz (only in Europe) 903mhz (only in the US) 2.4GHz (worldwide) Power and antenna rules vary, but the FCC lists them for the US. As for with a ham radio license, it depends on what you mean by 'free'. There are certainly high power ham bands, but you still must abide by the rules of ham operators such as no ...


3

The actual answer is a bit complicated and depends on a lot of things. In general, the answer is no, with exceptions, but the number of exceptions can be large, due to bilateral or multilateral agreements. In Europe, one of the most popular treaties is the CEPT recommendation T/R 61-01. Read the actual file for details, but in general, if you're within the ...


2

Contrary to other answers, there are ARPS networks out there that can be used without a Ham license. The key, as @PhilFrost points out, is that your original packet must not make it out to RF. The APRS-IS network is specifically focused on supporting an Internet backbone for APRS that might originate or be destined for RF and so requires a Ham license before ...


2

The LoRa standard use spread spectrum technology, provides 20 to 30 dB improvement over traditional modes, when configure at the type of low speed that you require. Some test documented on web shows 20km using 0.1 watt. These chip work at Global bands, EU, US ISM, 430, 8xx and 9xxMHz The Adafruit sites as full tutorial for two Arduino libraries Sigfox ...


2

RFM12B or RFM69CW sounds like what you want. Operates in the ISM band. There's sketches available for Arduino and with a decent yagi antenna you should be able to reach that far.


2

There was a bit of a kerfuffle last year over this very topic here in the states. See: Did the FCC just make Baofengs Illegal? While that is ongoing, I wasn't able to find any literature on Norway banning the Baofeng radios. However, even though they aren't part of the EU, they still require you to have a European Conference of Postal & ...


2

The UK is a western European Country - aside from Brexit. The exams are conducted in English language (multiple choice test). With the "Full Licence" you will receive the HAREC (Harmonized Amateur Radio Examination Certificate) according CEPT recommendation T/R 61-02. A person who holds a HAREC issued by a country that participates in recommendation T/R ...


2

An operator who holds an Amateur Extra license from the US is allowed to operate from Spain as a visitor via CEPT reciprocity, but CEPT T/R 61-01 and the Spanish regulation both make it clear that you lose that right once you become a resident of Spain, and you will need a Spanish license. You might be able to petition SETSI for a temporary license valid for ...


1

This YouTube video says that pressing FAST + A/B + A+B during power-on puts the radio into Service Mode, allowing you to extend the transmit frequency range. You must follow the steps indicated in the video precisely; in particular, you must set the radio's transmit frequency to the range on which you want to transmit before putting the radio in Service Mode....


1

I am wondering about a non-GSM transmitter leaking into the GSM1800 and whether these limits can be derived from the above document in the first place. They can't. This is subject to local laws, not communication standards – and usually formulated and enforced by the regulatory body of a country (FCC in the US, OFCOM in UK, BNetzA in Germany, MIC in Japan, …...


1

The same conditions are applied in Portugal as in the other CEPT countries. https://www.anacom.pt/render.jsp?contentId=956629 I am not sure where you received your information, check with ANACOM. This can be done by email, by post or im person. Email: info@anacom.pt https://www.google.com/maps/place/ANACOM+-+Autoridade+Nacional+de+Comunica%C3%A7%C3%B5es/@38....


1

This just in from Bjorn Myrvold, LB7ZG, at NRRL: Yes, you can bring your Baofeng UV82 transceiver and use it in Norway. Remember to use the prefix LA/.


1

First of all Poland is a CEPT country, as is the US, so you can follow CEPT rules. CEPT rules require the following, per ARRL: Bring their original US license Bring proof of US citizenship (generally in the form of a Passport) Bring a copy of the FCC's Public Notice (this notice contains its information in three languages, English, French and German) which ...


1

For the question of which frequencies can be used with an amateur licence, your amateur licence should tell you all this. You have tagged the question as "Europe", but that is a large geographical area with many countries in it. If you are operating under the CEPT agreements, the CEPT documentation will also tell you all this. Anything I could look up for ...


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