11

The text you refer to seems to be (emphasis mine): Sometimes before transmitting it is necessary to tune (adjust) the transmitter (or antenna tuner). Tuning should in the first instance be done on a dummy load. This is not referring to the use of an antenna tuner, whether integral or external. Rather, it is referring to tuning the final output stage ("...


7

Your TS430S has a solid state final and no internal antenna tuner. As such it is designed to work into a 50 ohm load at all times. This means you can disregard this note in your antenna tuner manual. If the tuner was used with a radio with tube finals then you would need to heed this cautionary note. If the tuner is used with a radio that has a built in ...


7

For an ideal, linear receiver, reducing the RF gain by 1 dB lowers signal and noise by 1 dB, so there would be no change in SNR. However, receivers are not perfectly linear. This means that besides just amplifying inputs, they also mix them to some extent. So any input to the receiver which contains more than just a single frequency will generate some ...


6

I think "RIT", for "receiver incremental tuning", is a better name for that knob because it more directly explains what it does: it tunes the receiver, without tuning the transmitter. The result is that you receive and transmit on different frequencies. It is similar to operating split, with less frequency separation. This is most useful when you've already ...


5

Two relevant facts about APRS: APRS stations are not obligated to get their location from GPS. And in practice, many fixed stations have manually entered locations. It is possible to transmit an explicitly coarse location (removing digits from the right). I do not think that this can be a coarse location because I cannot reproduce that center of lake point ...


5

This indicates that you are attempting to transmit out of band. This is typically a symptom of having the wrong offset (+/-) programmed for that channel. If you visit the Alinco FAQ page you will find this advice for similar models.


5

Sure, there are plenty. Unfortunately, they all seem to be selling something. The scientific consensus is quite clear: no known risk, beyond the obvious risk of being cooked which MPE limits are set to avoid.


5

The US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) had a system for basic measurement of frequencies as early as 1911. They used very basic calculations to determine the resonance of an LC circuit. The math was greatly advanced in 1923 in an article in Radio Broadcast magazine entitled ""Reducing the Guesswork in Tuning". The method involved careful measurements of ...


5

[Discovered this via a comment on another answer.] According to their Wikipedia article: Lecher lines were used as frequency measuring devices until frequency counters became available after World War 2. The idea is to short a transmission line after some distance, forming what we now would call a resonant stub. The resonant reflections set up standing ...


5

I contacted the seller and am still waiting on a satisfactory reply. HOWEVER, I did seem to find a workaround. Thanks for everyone's response! Remove Password MD380/90 1. Go to folder the CPS is in (C:\TYT) 2. look for file - setting.ini 3. Right click and edit 4. password=0 change to password=password 5. Save Connect radio to PC and turn on in normal ...


5

We use a non-radiating dummy load at first so that we minimize the chance of interfering with others. When our tuning adjustments are as close as they can be using that, then we can switch over to our antenna and make any needed adjustments. The HF bands are full of annoying carriers because hams perform their entire tuneup procedure into their antennas.


5

The simple answer is to transmit on the repeater's input frequency, saying something like " < your callsign > testing" and listen for the repeater's courtesy beep (assuming there is one) on its output. If you've heard the beep, then you've hit the repeater. Even without a "beep", the repeater's "presence" will be audible - its carrier will remain for a ...


4

You can tune by receiving, generally. When your antenna is tuned, then SWR losses are minimized. By reciprocity this minimizes receive losses also, so you can just listen to noise and tune for maximum received noise level. In fact, with more complicated tuners that have more adjustments, this is usually the first step so that you can be in the right ballpark ...


4

Unfortunately, you fell into one of the traps of the Chinese radios! You can't really assume what frequencies are they programmed with. Basically, the radios are designed to be programmed with a certain set of frequencies, just like so-called "professional" radios of many other manufacturers. The "channel" on the radio is just a memory location, into which ...


4

The calibration procedure is only used for determining the SWR - the forward and reflected power reading are not impacted. If you change power levels or frequency, you need to perform the calibration again to read the SWR. The calibrate procedure is to set the needle to the CAL position on the meter, not to the 100 watt reading as you described. Then flip ...


4

Glenn's answer here gave me the nudge I needed. Checking through parameters, I found #11 ... Offset ... 5.000 seemed default setting. With Offset at 5.000 the transmitter was stopped because that would mean operating on an Out of Band frequency. The anonymous OM who posted https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPCzJV3gPYQ did an admirable job of walking through ...


4

Contact the Seller for technical support. Explain that the unit is not working without a password and that this was not provided with the shipment. If no further support is available then consider the unit dead on arrival and start a refund and return process. If this sold through Amazon, then you do need to involve Amazon customer service. Online, you ...


4

S9 corresponds to 50 microvolts or -73 dBm. Thus S9+40 is -33 dBm. In theory, since it's much less then 20dBm your 7300 should be fine. HOWEVER I believe that +40 is just a maximum level your transceiver can show. Given that the attenuation of your switch is 60 dB and you are using 100W (50 dBm), -10 dBm will leak. It's much more than -33 dBm but you are ...


4

What does this noise reduction do? That should depend on the device. Generally, it's to be assumed that it applies (analog and/or digital) signal processing to improve the perceived Signal-to-Noise ratio. In simple cases, this might simply mean reducing the bandwidth of an analog receiver. Sure, voice will not sound as crisp, but if that buys one a ...


3

The Triple Band Stack will simply remember (store) the last frequency entered or tuned for that band and stack position. Try this: pick a band - 40 meters - by pressing [7.0] Tune to a frequency Press [7.0] again and tune to a different freq on 40 meters Press [7.0] again and tune to yet a different freq on 40 meters Now, press {7.0} repeatedly and you ...


3

It is important to understand that the SA takes some finite time to sweep (calculate the FFT buckets) for the frequency range in question. It is quite possible with a short duration signal that the sweep will catch none or only a small portion of a narrow band signal on a single sweep. On another pass it will potentially catch the peak of the narrow band ...


3

Regarding your original question, according to page 5-6 of the IC-7100 Advanced Instructions document, to receive "narrow" FM of 2.5 kHz deviation, select FILTER2 or FILTER3.


3

This is from post 35317, Jan 7, 2012 in the Yahoo Group for the FT-897: With reference to my post in December I have since had a word from Yaesu that the USER setting for menu items 65 to 70 is reserved for future use and not to be used.


3

Hannu OH1HAQ emailed me the true correct two-step answer: Set VOX GAIN to 0: long press on VOX button, rotate MULTI knob to set the level to 0, long press on VOX button. Enable VOX. With VOX GAIN set to 0, noise picked up by the microphone will not key the transmitter. However, replaying from the voice keyer memory will still key the transmitter if VOX is ...


3

In my experience, the Busy Channel Lockout or Busy Channel is the name for a feature which is completely different from what Cranky Emu describes. The Busy Channel Lockout prevents transmission on a frequency which is, or appears to be, already in use. Normally, you'd be able to hear the other side which is transmitting using your receiver, and avoid ...


3

See Appendix B of the User Manual. BaoFeng calls these "CTCSS" tones, more recently referred to as "PL" tones. Page 67 of the manual describes Menu 13, which allows you to set the value of the sub-audible tone according to table C.2 on page 78.


3

I'll answer the first part of your question, Ronald. I once witnessed a blind ham (WD8PIC) operate. His solid-state transceiver had a speech synthesizer that audibly spoke the frequency when the front-panel SPEECH button was pressed. What is more, he had everything on the front and back panels memorized. It was simply amazing how much he was able to do for ...


2

For a single contact, as you say, it's pointless. When you're talking as part of a group and one or two members are slightly off frequency it lets you temporarily tune your receiver for their signals without leaving the main frequency that everyone else is on. When it's on it "clarifies" their signal; when it's off you hear the rest of the group clearly.


2

In theory, if you can expose this device to a known field, you should be able to calculate some constants which allow you to convert the measured current (in μA) to a power density (in power per area, such as mW per cm2). Power is proportional to the square of current. T1 introduces some unknown gain, and the filters have some unknown loss. The antenna has ...


2

The clarifier is simply Yaesu's term for RIT (receiver incremental tuning) and XIT (transmitter incremental tuning), and can be used for either of those two adjustments, or turned off. RIT keeps your transmit frequency constant while you adjust your receive frequency. This way, when you're talking to a group (like in a net), you can more clearly hear the one ...


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