14

The full access policy states (my emphasis): No "SWL" (listen-only) access is permitted. EchoLink is a two-way system by design, and there is no mechanism to validate listen-only stations. The last part is key. You can't use the echo link system without being a validated licensed amateur. You logistically can not listen to this system without also ...


10

There is at least one app on the Google app store which will connect to echolink, which can be found here: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.echolink.android There are other apps that may also connect to Echolink, or are otherwise useful for Echolink users: https://play.google.com/store/search?q=echolink&c=apps


2

Foremost, remember that the FCC regulates stations and their emissions. The FCC does not care about the internet or how things work. They care about what comes out of your station, regardless of how that happened. Further, good amateur practice would dictate that regardless of where the regulations place the responsibility, if your equipment is being used ...


2

Why not indeed. A biquad sounds like a fine solution, with the only caveat that on 2 meters (145 MHz) it will be significantly larger than the 2.4 GHz constructions typically seen. The size of the panel is on the order of one wavelength, so you're looking at something approximately 2 meters square. At that size you may want to construct the panel from a cage ...


2

If you download and install the Echolink software, under Stations you can simply choose Locations/Europe/Germany and it will list all currently active nodes.


2

The EchoLink site talks about using satellite Internet, so you should be able to. You may experience a slight delay, but it will really only be noticeable for each party while awaiting a response. If you've ever seen live news coverage from a scene you will get the same effect. Anchor: "We're going to our reporter at the scene." Reporter at scene: ...


1

There are literally hundreds of antenna designs you could use. There are many variables to think about. The "best" answer probably depends heavily on what you (and the HOA) will tolerate. The Moxon you mentioned would be great, if allowed. If you need a smaller, less visible antenna then placing it as high as possible would help. You may be able to make a ...


1

How about a 2- or 3-element Yagi or cubical quad? A 2-element quad would be only 1 meter (or less) square on the ends, and likely even shorter on the sides between the driven element and reflector. You could even make the enclosure look like (or be!) a birdhouse.


1

I do a lot of off-network travel and one thing I found out is that you can cache Google Maps as described on this link. Then your Google Maps app will keep running as long as you have GPS (and if you don't you likely have bigger problems).


1

Yes, you can leave voice messages with your radio, if the EchoLink server you connect to (via RF) has the svxlink server daemon running on a Linux system. This can be done with any DTMF capable radio.


1

You have two questions. First answer is no, page 70 of the manual, the menu option is TOT and default as you've noticed is 10 and the options are 3, 5, or 10 minutes. Second answer is you could rig up some array of 555s or a microcontroller such that it unkeys for half a second every nine minutes and nobody's going to notice but the rig TOT will reset.


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