10

When testing applicants that are vision impaired we use versions of the test that do not include any diagrams. I am a VE and there is a state school for the deaf and blind near us so we have had several vision impaired applicants over the years. Please try to let us know ahead of time so we can ready with the test and so that we can have an extra VE to read ...


7

Yes, volunteer exam coordinators must provide accommodations for applicants with visual impairments. For the best experience, please contact the test team in advance so they can best prepare for your needs. The FCC's Part 97 regulations which govern the amateur radio service in the USA (you'll learn more about these as you study) cover this in section 97....


3

Blind operators typically end up being highly skilled CW operators which are highly valued in ham clubs that do contesting and are greatly appreciated and frequently treated as a VIP. But as the hobby is largely reliant on listening and speaking, blind operators integrate well even without CW skills. Testers do not typically have resources to accommodate ...


3

I'll answer the first part of your question, Ronald. I once witnessed a blind ham (WD8PIC) operate. His solid-state transceiver had a speech synthesizer that audibly spoke the frequency when the front-panel SPEECH button was pressed. What is more, he had everything on the front and back panels memorized. It was simply amazing how much he was able to do for ...


3

While a VE has answered definitively above, I'd also add another kind of answer. When I was studying for my license exam, the study site repeatedly pointed out that "if you have trouble with math, you can skip all the math questions and still pass the exam." They made the same point about certain other sub-classes of questions, such as band allocation. I'm ...


2

There are accessories for some radios that provide a speech capability. Here is a link to a web site, HamRadioAndVision, that has some information. https://www.hamradioandvision.com/accessible-transceivers-vision/ Also keep in mind that a person can be legally blind but still have some sight. I believe that a person with 20/100 vision is considered to be ...


2

The SNP specs that I can find online say they can differentiate puffs shorter than 0.25 seconds, which should be good for use as a straight key at at least 5 wpm (maybe 3 to 5X slower than skilled hand keying). You’ll have to try one out to see if a trained wind instrument musician could operate one faster than these published numbers. Or if a sideswiper, ...


1

SNP keys have been built, and were apparently described in Mars 2004 QST. As I'm not a member of ARRL I can't access it, but the first page of the article can bee seen in the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsE-S2eXhK0 It says that "experienced users routinely reach 25 wpm or more", which could be interpreted as being comparable ...


1

There appear to be MIDI harmonica controller products, as well as keyer software that takes MIDI input. Probably designed from the start to be highly responsive to fast musical rhythms from air pressure change input. And with keyer software support already adapted. See: https://www.lekholminstruments.com


1

An SNP isn’t very fast at all*. If you’re okay with your mouth being “in use” perhaps a bite-actuated switch in place of (and configured the same as) a straight key would be better. You could “key” much faster that way, I’d bet. Just make absolutely sure to avoid RF burns in the mouth. :-) Prototype could be as simple as some contacts and wires on the “open” ...


1

I don't like the answer "just pass enough of the rest of the exam so it doesn't matter if you fall this one." That is doing a disservice to our blind friends. The point of the question is just to identify what the schematic symbol is for the electrical component. Just describe what you see in basic detail. Especially when we're talking about the Technician ...


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