New answers tagged

1

Generally QRP is considered to be 10 watts or less. A small RF amp could get your 3 watts up to 9 which would be a more powerful signal but this is something you would have to homebrew. You can get the power needed to drive this transceiver and amp by wiring the batteries to increase the voltage to the level required, (series vs. parallel wiring). This all ...


3

If you haven't done much QRP operating, QRP is a funny thing. Sometimes propagation is great, and you wonder why anyone would bother with 100 W or more. I'll never forget my first DX QSO, from Oregon to Estonia, running 11 W to a vertical, by gray-line propagation at the bottom of the sunspot cycle in 2006. Other times it seems like a complete waste of ...


3

It makes a difference of: $$ 10 \times \log_{10}\left(3 \over 5\right) = 2.2 \:\mathrm{dB} $$ How big is 2.2 dB? See How big is a decibel? It's also relevant to note: if the 12V battery is lead acid, the charged voltage can be as high as 13.7. Furthermore, while a boost converter might further increase your transmit power, it's likely to make noise which ...


0

For any transmitter, if you double the power, this might seem a lot, but at the other end at a receiver the signal will increase by only 3 dB which is half an S point. So an increase of 3W to 5W is 2.2 dB which is a bit less than half an S point. This change is negligible and you won't notice much difference. However if the level of your transmitted signal ...


Top 50 recent answers are included