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1

SNP keys have been built, and were apparently described in Mars 2004 QST. As I'm not a member of ARRL I can't access it, but the first page of the article can bee seen in the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsE-S2eXhK0 It says that "experienced users routinely reach 25 wpm or more", which could be interpreted as being comparable ...


1

There appear to be MIDI harmonica controller products, as well as keyer software that takes MIDI input. Probably designed from the start to be highly responsive to fast musical rhythms from air pressure change input. And with keyer software support already adapted. See: https://www.lekholminstruments.com


2

The SNP specs that I can find online say they can differentiate puffs shorter than 0.25 seconds, which should be good for use as a straight key at at least 5 wpm (maybe 3 to 5X slower than skilled hand keying). You’ll have to try one out to see if a trained wind instrument musician could operate one faster than these published numbers. Or if a sideswiper, ...


1

An SNP isn’t very fast at all*. If you’re okay with your mouth being “in use” perhaps a bite-actuated switch in place of (and configured the same as) a straight key would be better. You could “key” much faster that way, I’d bet. Just make absolutely sure to avoid RF burns in the mouth. :-) Prototype could be as simple as some contacts and wires on the “open” ...


3

I learned it years ago by listening to the dits and Dahas spacing with the spacing much slower. I would recommend go as fast as where you can make out the different dits and dahas. Then as your Think about it" time gets shorter, decrease the spacing pad. For example, the individual letters at 10 or 15 wpm but the spacing is 5 wpm. I also hit a ...


1

If you listen on the air, you'll hear Morse QSOs at a wide range of speeds. These days probably most code is formed by keyers, which form individual characters perfectly, but you'll also hear people sending code with straight keys and bugs, which can have very different timing. In particular, many operators who use bugs send code with fast closely-spaced ...


4

If you want to actually successfully operate, then you should (eventually) practice copying Morse Code at the full range of WPM speeds you expect to hear over the air. Most Morse Code practice software allows you to change the WPM, try from maybe 12-20 WPM for SKN (straight key nights) up to 24-40 WPM for CW contesting. If one practices on only slow ...


3

CW is an interesting discipline. There are two distinct elements, encoding and decoding. You reference decoding yet refer to encoding guidelines. Learning CW, I was taught to associate the DIT, DAH and REST as music, both in tempo and beat. The principle being to process a combination of sounds reflexively not analytically, as you stated in your initial post....


5

It is one thing to know the English word "car". It is another thing to be able to understand this word in all the ways it may be spoken. American English will end it with a rhotic "r" (/kɑɹ/), while a RP accent will omit the "r" entirely and just say /kɑː/. Some people speak fast, some people slowly. Sometimes you will have to ...


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