5

None of the above. There are no "73 codes" like 10-codes, 73 is just 73. Yes, I know about the 92 code, but it's well and truly dead, with no survivors other than 73 and occasionally 88, so realistically speaking they stand on their own. And 73 doesn't mean "end of transmission", it means "best wishes" or "warm regards"...


4

Q codes are mostly used with morse code to shorten common phrases, and some people discourage their use in phone modes, even in amateur radio. (Other people think they are cool and continue to use them.) A list of Q codes can be found here In communication classes I have taken, the 10 codes are generally discouraged, not because they come from CB, but ...


3

Those "wall wart" style power supplies are likely to lack the power needed here. As others point out here the radio will likely somewhere between 1.5 to 2 amps to operate as intended. I don't recall seeing a 12 volt wall wart that can provide more than 1 amp. Do you have a "soap on a rope" kind of power supply in your parts bins? That ...


3

There's a lot of pieces to this question and it sounds like you've already split some of them off to other sites which is good. It's still a little unclear what you're trying to do with the radio itself: Send the audio buffer from the transmitter to the microcontroller In the United States, the Citizens Band Radio Service refers to just one specific set of ...


2

If you are going to buy an antenna designed for use with that handheld, then it should work fine. Otherwise, you need to make sure that you get an antenna designed for the frequencies used by the radio (in this case around 27MHz, or 11-metre band), that has an impedance of 50 ohms, and has a BNC plug on it. As long as the antenna meets those criteria, it ...


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