16

You can, but you probably don't want to. CB radios are limited to a set of 40 channels, most don't have frequency control. That somewhat limits the utility in the ham band where we have a very wide swath of frequency we can use. A converted CB radio would, at best, have control over only a narrow portion of the 10 meter band. They are also limited in power....


13

To extend on the legal part of the answer: Hams can use any radio to transmit, as long as they are in the right frequency band, are transmitting using allowed power, etc. Non-licensed radio services on the other hand are subject to a host of restrictions, generally including fixed antennas, small power limits, radio-by-radio certification, etc. To put ...


9

I can't tell for sure without better pictures, but that looks like, not an RF connector per se, but a 3/8"-24 stud. This is very common for CB antennas. The reason I say it is not an RF connector is because it only makes one electrical contact. This means it can only be used for “monopole” antennas, not for feed lines or other types of antennas. To confirm,...


9

Yes, very strong radio signals can be picked up by just about any device with a speaker and a transistor in it. The transistor acts as a rectifier, forming a crude envelope detector. Amplitude modulated voice can be heard quite clearly, single-sideband modulated voice is quite garbled but often still somewhat intelligible. No cause for alarm: it won't ...


7

An RTL Dongle is Receive-Only. You can't transmit with it.


6

Congratulations on earning your General license! You may get the antenna to work using the internal antenna tuner. Make sure the antenna is on a large groundplane. Try tuning it up with low power (< 10 watts) at first to see if the ATU can handle the impedance matching. If it doesn't tune up, reducing the length of the vertical element may help. Try ...


6

No, there are not, because it is not legal to have a radio that can transmit in both CB and amateur radio bands. To be legal, CB radios must be part 95 type accepted. The FCC prohibits a device to be both part 95 type accepted and capable of being used in amateur radio frequencies. Having said that, many amateur radios are also wide band receivers, and ...


6

Welcome to Amateur Radio Stack Exchange. Be sure to take the Tour. It shows what this community expects and how to craft a question in such a way that it will attract useful answers. In this way the database is expanded for the benefit of everyone. Here are your answers: No, they are not the same. Imho, ham radio is much better. It is just plain fun. ...


6

As mentioned in another answer, it sounds like it’s not SSB. The next question is whether it’s AM or FM. “CB” can mean different things in different countries, and you don’t say which country you are in. But you say that it’s UHF - and FM is a much more common mode to use at UHF frequencies (and even at VHF) than AM. If it were SSB, it would usually have a ...


5

CB is licensed by rule (like FRS), and CB transmitters must be certified by the FCC (also like FRS). If the SDR you're using doesn't have an identifying label on it, you're probably not allowed to transmit on CB frequencies (of course, monitoring them is fine). So, aside from the technical question of whether your SDR will transmit in that band, you need ...


5

If your car uses petrol (gasoline) rather than diesel, then the ignition system can potentially generate a lot of noise because of the high-voltage system used to generate the sparks that ignite the fuel. Electric motors such as those used in the windscreen washer pump and/or wipers (or electric windows, etc.), can also generate noise. This would mean that ...


4

There are some CB-style "11m" multimode (AM/FM/SSB and sometimes even CW) sets that operate in bands at the top of 27MHz, and some of these can be made to work at the bottom of the 10-metre band. These can usually be used legally by licensed amateur operators, as long as they stick to frequencies for which they are licensed, and follow the band plans for ...


4

Australia has two CB bands, the old 27MHz band, where radios were either AM or SSB, & the UHF one, which uses FM.(which is apparently, the one you have.) Other countries have variations in either the band or mode of their 27MHz CB operations (27MHz FM is common in Europe), but although many have "CB like" frequency allocations at UHF, Australia ...


4

Theoretically yes, if you carefully control the lengths of the cables and the placement of the antennas. This is called a phased array. However, you would get a far better improvement in range by using an antenna which is not a rubber ducky, like a 1/4 wave whip or a dipole. Rubber ducky antennas are electrically shortened, making them smaller. The price of ...


3

Yes, you can convert a CB to a ham band radio. Even an AM radio can be used in the ham bands; a small portion of the 10 meter band is allocated to AM service (29,000,000 Hz to 29,200,000 Hz). You don't need an amplifier. Many hams work varied countries using a QRP rig. Most QRP rigs are around 5 watts or less. I've heard a few say 10 watts or less is QRP, ...


3

To augment my comments above as an answer including photos. I repeat my comments here: Why would you knock into stuff with a CB antenna? I have an HF, 80-10 meter, screwdriver antenna on my pickup truck. The overall size of the antenna is about the same as an 11-meter CB antenna. The top of that antenna is 11 feet 4 inches from the ground. In the 10 ...


3

There is no minimum length; all else being equal, a shorter antenna (with the proper loading/matching) is just less efficient. Antenna efficiency is not a critical issue if the antenna is not being used for transmitting (and you do not have strong noise sources inside your vehicle). Therefore, you primarily need to concern yourself with transmitting antennas....


3

You didn't mention if the antenna was a full-sized quarter wave-length or a shorter antenna with a loading coil. This makes a difference for two different reasons. I will handle the first reason immediately -- no full sized quarter-wave 11-meter (CB in US) antenna should be mounted with a magnetic mount -- although the "wrongness" of this type of mount ...


3

Many hams who do a lot of mobile HF operating (CB is HF also) take the time to bond many different parts of the vehicle together. The theory is that your vertical antenna is 1/4 wavelength long electrically, but it's only half the antenna; the other half is the ground plane, through which current must pass for efficient operation. There's lots of ...


3

CB or its close relatives fall into the HF frequency range (covering somewhere around 26 to 28 MHz, depending on country), so anything that accurately calls itself a VHF radio will not transmit (and most likely will not receive) CB. In general, what you do to answer this kind of question is find the radio's specifications — either on the web site or in the ...


3

Most connector plugs make contact at 3 points: 1 Tip (pointy bit), 2 Sleeve (opposite the tip), and 3 Ring (between tip and sleeve). Depending on the rig, two of these will carry audio. One of the audio lines also goes to the Push To Talk switch, with the other side of that switch having the third wire. When you push the switch, you short those lines ...


3

Ham radio is the most flexible and most capable, and I should say in my opinion, the most fun of the two Ham versus CB radio. I am not answering for Shortwave Listener type radio hobby because that is quite a bit different in some respects and I know quite a few Ham radio operators who are also avid shortwave listeners (to non ham band broadcasts). Ham ...


3

Those "wall wart" style power supplies are likely to lack the power needed here. As others point out here the radio will likely somewhere between 1.5 to 2 amps to operate as intended. I don't recall seeing a 12 volt wall wart that can provide more than 1 amp. Do you have a "soap on a rope" kind of power supply in your parts bins? That ...


3

There's a lot of pieces to this question and it sounds like you've already split some of them off to other sites which is good. It's still a little unclear what you're trying to do with the radio itself: Send the audio buffer from the transmitter to the microcontroller In the United States, the Citizens Band Radio Service refers to just one specific set of ...


2

CB radio service transmitters are limited to 4 watts output power. Figure that that output circuit is only 50% efficient at most, and in round numbers you'll need probably at least a 10W input if not more. For DC circuits the power (watts) is equal to the voltage times the current (amps). Your 12V, 0.3A adapter is therefore rated to supply 3.6 watts which is ...


2

The CB mag mount can be used on 10 meters by attaching a wire to the the shielding at the base then extending the wire to the side. There is always some length that is resonant on whatever frequency desired. On my particulat CB antenna the side wire was about twice the length of the vertical. Total length will be a bit longer than 8 feet (half-wave). My ...


2

Yes, you can. If you are an amateur radio operator you can grab any radio including an American / Australian CB and use it as long as it has been modified to operate on the amateur bands. Australian / American 27 MHz. CB's were easy to modify to 28 MHz. Both crystal synthesis & PLL, However, I have only known of one that was modified to work on 21 MHz.


2

Shortwave or HF is a broad term that describes any radio use roughly in the 1mhz-30mhz range, and includes shortwave listening, CB, and Ham Radio. Shortwave listening includes listening to anything in this range, including broadcast shortwave. CB and Ham Radio in the US allow receiving and transmitting on specific ranges of frequencies based on laws and ...


2

Should I attach a ground wire to my plate so my antenna will be grounded as well? I wouldn't bother. The "grounding" of the antenna at DC like a multimeter would measure is irrelevant. You care about the impedance at 27 MHz which is very different. At 27 MHz, a capacitance which has an infinite impedance at DC can be a very low impedance, and a wire of the ...


2

If you are going to buy an antenna designed for use with that handheld, then it should work fine. Otherwise, you need to make sure that you get an antenna designed for the frequencies used by the radio (in this case around 27MHz, or 11-metre band), that has an impedance of 50 ohms, and has a BNC plug on it. As long as the antenna meets those criteria, it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible