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6

None. Basically, aside from a few ISM bands, none of which are covered by your radio, you can transmit nowhere without a license, unless you're using hardware that restricts you to legal usage (e.g. DECT phones; you don't need a license to operate a wireless indoor phone, but the phone has to be built in a way that prohibits any other usage).


6

According to ARRL: Identification for US amateurs is the US call separated by a stroke and the appropriate Canadian prefix identifier (e.g. N1KB/VE3) In every case I can think of, one is required to identify the location from which they are transmitting, if it is not in their call sign, or at least a different country. And usually they want more than ...


6

Referencing this page which outlines the licensing requirements http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01862.html you do need to obtain a license to transmit. Also, it's good that you mention you are from Canada, as it seems Canada still requires Morse code as part of the licensing scheme to operate in certain scenarios. If you only obtain the "...


6

There are advantages and disadvantages to each. Do you have citizenship in either country? U.S. citizens are prohibited from transmitting in the U.S. using a foreign license. As well, Canadian citizens are prohibited from transmitting in Canada using a foreign license. What sort of privileges are you looking for? I don't think there's much difference ...


5

The ARRL's information may help you: Foreign amateurs who wish to operate in the US and are not US licensees or citizens may do so in one of three ways: If the country of which you are a citizen and an amateur licensee has entered into a multilateral operating agreement with the US, CEPT or IARP, no additional permit is required -- simply bring your CEPT or ...


3

In short, by the letter of the law you cannot posess a transmitter in Canada without a license. In practice, no one gets worked up about it, and people often buy gear before getting their license.


3

According to Alan McLean of Industry Canada if a radio approved for use in LMR service in Canada, for example, can be software reprogrammed (without hardware modifications) to be used on the amateur bands, then such reprogramming and use is permitted by any Canada amateur radio license class as it is considered an SDR under section 44: In regard to the ...


3

I forwarded this question to the Radio Amateurs of Canada Regulatory Advisor and received an interpretation. To summarize as direct responses to my original questions: Yes, an unlicenced individual can use equipment at a club station if supervised by a qualified operator. A non-qualified operator should use the call sign an authorized operator would use ...


3

As a friend has just gone through exactly this, I can confirm that yes, your certificate and callsign are still valid. As wkm noted above, the RAC states that “The Amateur Radio Certificates are valid for your lifetime”. Wile this is great for returning operators, it does mean that the Canadian Amateur Radio Operator Certificates database contains many SKs ...


3

If you are a citizen of the US or Canada, you should get a callsign in that country because you must have a callsign in that country in order to be able to transmit there as a citizen. Also, that will allow you to use any reciprocal authority that country has to operate in other countries. If you wish, you may also get a callsign in the other country, but ...


2

In order to get a licence in the US, I believe it is now a requirement (since 2000 or so) to have a US Social Security Number. I used to have a US Extra Class licence that I got in 1995, that I could not renew when it expired in 2005 for that reason (I am a UK citizen and do not have a US SSN). Reading the answer provided by GrantB, you can see that in ...


2

According to RAC: The Amateur Radio Certificates are valid for your lifetime.


2

If there is any merit to your claim, consider that Canada has ~ 69,000 hams while the US has ~800,000 hams according to Wikipedia. With less than 10% of the number of hams in Canada compared to the US, it is plausible that for any mode you will hear far less Canadian hams than US hams. If you then project that the population density of hams follows the ...


2

The "Radio Amateurs of Canada" national club seems to offer a number of resources and pointers on "How to Start" at RAC and how to self-study. They also provide a list of local clubs; getting into contact with a club close to you may be a good alternative to starting and studying completely on your own.


2

In addition to the answer from @Marcus, I'd like to point out that (since you already have the radio) it's just a small step to get a basic ham radio license. Not familiar with the classes as used in Canada, but surely there is a "basic" class which shouldn't take too much effort to get. While pretty basic, the knowledge required is rather interesting (basic ...


2

In my experience the parts allocated to PMR are extremely busy, it's the most popular band for walkie talkies and car radios, best compromise between antenna length (60 MHz is quite bulky) and path loss + diffraction (450 MHz is not as nice). But busy doesn't mean 0.5 Erlang, because analog FM and Push To Talk are so inefficient. Without actually analysing ...


1

Canadian frequency spectrum allocations can be found here: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf10759.html#t2 Hope this helps.


1

The following Government of Canada links may be of interest: https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf01709.html http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf06073.html Good luck.


1

It was the case, once, that countries of the British Commonwealth required a license for private ownership of a radio or television receiver, not just equipment for transmitting. As radio broadcasting developed during war times in Europe, I believe this was meant to register potential points of espionage and as a source of funding for the BBC and the ...


1

From https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/025.nsf/eng/h_00006.html#tao4: '...you must bring your amateur radio operator’s certificate/licence and have obtained a CEPT certificate from your home administration. If your country is not part of the CEPT agreement you must obtain a letter of authority from the Amateur Radio Service Centre (ARSC). Visiting amateurs must ...


1

I suspect that you're referring to the Canadian "Restricted Radio Operator's" licence. This is a certificate of proficiency for operators of licenced aeronautical radios and in the past there were versions for maritime and commercial radio operators. I suspect that you probably had the now-obsolete maritime version for your job as a water taxi operator. The ...


1

According to this Canadian government web site, marine radio licenses are no longer required for vessels operating in Canadian waters only, and not the territorial waters of another country. If you're planning to travel to another country, then the thing to do is probably to contact Industry Canada to see if your license is still valid. (Here's a link to ...


1

I would completely agree with the comment about the Canadian exam being very tough without an electronics background. I've wanted to get my license for years, but I'm really only interested in that so I can have something in the vehicle. I have zero interest in building my own antenna towers or building my own radios. I have no interest in competitions or ...


1

If anyone else out there has done both the US and Canadian tests, I think they will agree that the Canadian tests are significantly harder for anyone who does not have a solid electronics background. So, if the reader can legally test in the US and use in Canada then do so as the Technician and General are quite easy with a couple weeks of study and there ...


1

Communications law is a complex subject. In your case, you have the added issue of import/export regulations. I suggest you engage a competent attorney to guide you through these matters. Here are my answers based on my understanding of the questions you have raised. Please accept that I am not acting as your attorney. A transmitter that is capable of being ...


1

Normally only licensed radio-amateurs holding Advanced certifications are allowed to build radio-transmitting apparatus. Please consider getting licensed: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf01862.html There are amateur radio clubs near where you live that may help with studying for a license as well as with answering some of your questions. The ...


1

The DVAP hotspot uses (or at least can be configured to use) simplex operation. This means that both your radio and the DVAP hotspot use the same frequency to transmit and receive. If you are operating with the DVAP in simplex mode, it does not count as a repeater and so an Advanced Qualification is not necessary.


1

After consulting with a Canadian D-STAR gateway operator, I have learned that yes, club stations can register callsigns on D-STAR. Operating in this manner would be no different than operating a club station over the air with a non D-STAR radio or using a D-STAR device with a personal callsign. The one caveat to this is that if the club in question wishes ...


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