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6

If I understand the description correctly: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab If that's all it is, I wouldn't say it's any big deal. Whenever you have multiple paths to ground, current will split between them. It's these currents that keep "ground" approximately the same voltage everywhere: an essential assumption in the ...


4

An anecdote: I had problems with my station which included computer-radio interconnections; some of my devices (RTL-SDRs) would lock up when I powered on my Yaesu FT-897. I eventually tracked this down to the power-on inrush currrent of the radio passing through coax shields and the chassis of the antenna switch that both were connected to. I solved the ...


4

With the battery case detached from the device, look at the side with the copper terminals. You should see several seams that can be exploited with a sufficiently thin shim. I carefully used a box cutter on the right hand inner seam of the battery case and separated the battery case into two pieces without actually cutting or breaking any of the small ...


3

I wouldn't risk directly connecting a 9.6v battery to a radio that expects 5-6v. The simplest solution would probably be the diodes mentioned in the comment to your question, but as the battery voltage dropped the voltage reaching the radio would drop as well, and as the battery got low the output voltage after the diodes might be too low to power the radio,...


1

Should a 'a not so good contact' at the HT's external jack/plug be ruled out as a contributory factor, the only way to avoid DC current in the coax braid would be to have a separate battery pack for the HT. The moot point is whether DC current in the braid does matter.


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