6

The plug used in the Baofeng base is a 5.5 mm/2.1 mm barrel connector. However, you cannot simply parallel a bunch of base charger units and power them off of a single AC or DC adapter without properly considering the total current required. The stock AC wall wart for the charger puts out 10 volts at 0.5 amps. Each charging base will require 0.5 amps. So, ...


5

Never owned a similar device, but judging from the product pictures: Indeed, the charging logic for the battery is not inside the handset, but the charging cradle, and hence, that would quite likely be confused should you transmit while charging, as that looks like a sudden drop in battery voltage. So, the other option is what Hytera sells as "Battery ...


4

When you parallel batteries, the combined reliability generally becomes less than the least reliable battery. In reliability engineering, this follows the equation: $$R_S=R_1*R_2*R_3 \tag 1$$ where $R_1, R_2,R_3$ is the reliability of the respective individual batteries. The older batteries are inherently more unreliable. Battery failure modes can cause ...


2

Well, it's a commercial product, and I'd be very surprised would Yaesu be willing to deal with the anger if it wasn't safe to do something as obvious as that. Also, from an engineering point of view, it would be trivial to shut off functionality not safe for use during charging – that literally takes but one transistor. I'm also not sure what you mean with ...


2

It's perfectly safe. Note that you will slow charging down, since you are using some of the battery's stored energy to monitor the frequency. A better solution might be to get a second battery for your radio, along with a charging dock if you don't already have one. With many modern hand-held radios, charging docks increase the charging rate compared to ...


2

That's very unusual. Modern electronics do not usually contain significant volumes of fluid that could leak out like that. The most likely sort of leak one might find is an electrolytic capacitor losing its electrolyte, but that is more likely to make a circuit board corroded and stained in the vicinity than to manage to escape the housing. And the ...


2

I'll bet those old batteries are just plain worthless. Based on our experience with many deep-cycle golf cart and automotive batteries, those 10- and 20-year-old batteries almost certainly are not capable of accepting anywhere near a full charge. At best, some cells may work to some degree while other cells are just plain dead, Jim. ;-) You can determine ...


1

Wall warts aren't terribly complicated devices, they're just small transformers to convert the commercial AC into low voltage DC. There won't be any batteries in it, but there are likely capacitors. As noted here, the electrolyte is mildly toxic and corrosive, but not to the point where it's a significant HAZMAT issue. Just clean it up with a paper towel and ...


1

I will answer the final question: "Should I return them to the store?" Yes. If they are still under warranty, return them and get a replacement. If the battery is a sealed unit inside, then opening them might void the warranty - and if it's not, then chances are it's the charging circuitry that has failed. Return them and get a replacement - I don't know ...


1

The two extended batteries I have (for a BF-F8HP, but as far as I know, this model uses the same batteries as the UV-5R) have direct charging input socket on the battery, separate from the contacts for the charging cradle. The chargers made to plug into this socket (that I've seen advertised) are direct USB, suggesting that either the charge cable itself ...


1

The UV-5R has a nominal battery voltage of 7.4V and the supplied charger provides 8.4V with 600mA current limit. I believe this means the battery max charging voltage is 8.4 volts. Directly applying 9 volts would be risky. Certainly make sure the current stays limited to a sane amount and certainly make sure the battery never gets charged above 8.4 volts. ...


1

The charging cradle is an external power supply that can power the radio and charge the battery at the same time. Yes, that is safe.


1

It should be perfectly safe. I have done it for ages with my Yaesu FT60R handheld so yours shouldn't be any different. Moreover, some people use their handheld as a (semi-) fixed station using a power supply and an external antenna.


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