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1

You had three separate questions there, I'll try to clarify some concepts: How can a time - varying magnetic field induce current in vertical strips Faraday's law of induction tells us how much there is electromotive force (a kind of sum of voltages that must be dissipated in the loop) along a conductive loop when a magnetic field passing through that loop ...


3

It's analogous to a fan dipole, where you feed multiple dipoles, with different resonant frequencies, in parallel, under the assumption that if one of them corresponds to the band you're transmitting on, then it will have the lowest |Z| and therefore take most of the current, while the other elements remain more-or-less inactive. Except that: It's not a ...


3

It appears that Hustler simply calls it a multiband vertical. I would call it a "center loaded fan vertical." It's definitely a vertical, being operated against some conductor that represents "ground" (e.g., auto body). And, the coil-loaded elements fan out in an arrangement similar to a fan dipole. Searching the internet turns up a ...


3

From what you describe, it doesn't seem the vertical elements would be fed at all. Since they pass directly through the plane of symmetry of the horizontal elements they experience no electric field along the vertical axis, and so, aren't driven at all. It's as if they aren't there. Furthermore, there's a simpler way for the antenna to be "both ...


4

From your description: the vertical polarized antenna has no feed point. Since the antennas are orthogonal and on-axis there is almost no mutual effect, no coupling: the feed impedance of the horizontal antenna does not change. (2) No need for re-adjustment of the gamma match. (3) Not any effect from the vertical antenna parts. (4) No coupling, no power ...


1

The matching circuit looks similar to the type of N:1 balun/unun used to feed an end-fed half-wave without too great an impedance mismatch. Except in this case L3 shortens the dipole at its center, and the portion below half of L3 is the counter-pose to the quarter wave section above half of L3.


3

This arrangement: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab is called an L-match. Adding a tap to the inductor creates an autotransformer which allows an additional degree of freedom in the tuning network. It's useful here because the impedance of the half-wave element is much too high; the autotransformer steps it down to something ...


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