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Here is one example of such, based on a NEC study...

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The NEC4.2 study/graphic first below shows how a structure comprised of conductors to (roughly) emulate the a-c power lines in a wood-frame house might affect the radiation patterns of a 40m-band vertical monopole located six feet away from one side of that house.

The effects of this may be different than those expected. enter image description here

Below are the patterns for that monopole and its buried ground rod, by themselves (other things equal).

enter image description here

Added on 2 Feb 2018: This may be drifting too far off the original topic, but the affect of even relatively tall structures with steel frames on the FAR FIELDS of a transmit antenna can be negligible, as long as the dimensions of the structure are small enough in terms of wavelength.

Below is a graphic showing the measured relative fields of an AM broadcast station on both sides of a path from a distant transmit antenna toward, and past such a structure. RJF

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ It would be nice to also see the pattern of the antenna without the "house", for the sake of comparison. $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Feb 1 '18 at 17:44
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    $\begingroup$ OK, I added them to the original post. $\endgroup$ – Richard Fry Feb 1 '18 at 18:53
  • $\begingroup$ So the "house" changes the best takeoff angle quite a bit, to be nearly vertical rather than 25° or 30°. I wouldn't have expected such a large effect, but perhaps that makes sense given that a lot of the RF is being absorbed and re-radiated. The azimuth pattern is distorted also, which is less of a surprise. Very interesting! $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Feb 1 '18 at 19:26

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