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Ok, I get that "RF hash" is some sort of slang for "RF interference" (think CB), but does it refer to a particular type or source of interference? Do tell.

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    $\begingroup$ It's RF chopped up with onions and potatoes. $\endgroup$ – hobbs - KC2G Jan 5 '18 at 14:51
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    $\begingroup$ such "soft" terms usually don't have an explicit definition, but change with context and with the person using it. I propose: rather ask about something that can be answered definitively, like "I've read at <address or magazine or book..> that XYZ leads to 'RF hash', but I don't know what that is, and I certainly don't want that to happen. What does the author mean with it, and how to avoid it?" $\endgroup$ – Marcus Müller Jan 5 '18 at 17:03
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    $\begingroup$ @MarcusMüller This is a GREAT comment! I'm surprised that there is only one upvote (mine) to your comment. $\endgroup$ – Mike Waters Jan 6 '18 at 2:37
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Discovered on another thread (eham) that "RF hash" is slang for broadband noise, meaning a) RF interference that has an unusually large bandwidth (continuously spread) or b) covers multiple frequency ranges over an unusually large spectrum (non-continuous spread).

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When I think of "RF Hash" I think of a constant "sparky" sort of interference, like an insulator arcing, or RF noise from an electric motor or some gas discharge lamps or lamp dimmers. Compared to, say, lightning (non-repetitive) or white noise (not "sparky".) Whether that's the CBers definition or not, I don't know.

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Hash is wide band radiated noise. But it doesn't have to be wide band. Radiated is the key word here. Which is why it's usually related to RF. It can also occur at audio frequency.

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