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This question is not about Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum!

In SDRs, say USRP, if we are transmitting in a particular frequency band, can we dynamically hop from that band and transmit from another band?
If so, what's the range to which it can hop? If not, why can't it?

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  • $\begingroup$ We'll need more information about the software you are using. For instance, in SDRsharp, there is a tuning block in the lower left and a simple double-click will take you to a different frequency, regardless of band. Is that what you mean? $\endgroup$ – SDsolar Nov 10 '17 at 17:31
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    $\begingroup$ This question is far too broad. "USRP" is a product line, not a product. If you have a specific question about a specific device, you'll have to be more specific about it! $\endgroup$ – Marcus Müller Nov 11 '17 at 10:05
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There is nothing which fundamentally prevents any radio, software defined or otherwise, from changing bands dynamically. Next to me I have a Yaesu FT-897 which is quite old and not an SDR, but it can change bands in the time it takes to switch a relay, commanded to do so either by a button press or a command from the serial port on the back.

In fact software has little to do with it: while the software defines the modulation, the transmit frequencies are limited by hardware, such as filters, oscillators, and amplifiers.

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I don't know for sure for USRP, but the driver's API of RtlSdr and HackRF allows to change the frequency while running. Very probably USRP allows it as well.

So yes it is possible if the application used supports it. The range is only limited by the allowed transmit range or your hardware.

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  • $\begingroup$ Re-reading your response I see you specifically mention transmitting. RtlSdr doesn't support transmitting, but for receving it stays true for the RtlSdr. $\endgroup$ – Martin Herren HB9FXX-KJ4WOH Nov 10 '17 at 17:01
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    $\begingroup$ all USRPs can arbitrarily change frequency why operating, and that independently for RX and TX. $\endgroup$ – Marcus Müller Nov 11 '17 at 10:03

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