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And what will I need to mount it in my wall?

Antenna Base

Cable

Connector

I'd like to mount it similar to the below images in my wall. Will I need any additional adapters/converters?

Wall Jacks

So to put all my questions in one place:

  1. What is this RF connector(s)?
  2. What additional hardware/adapters will I need to mount it in my wall like in the picture (connector types in the image are irrelevant, it's just an example of how I want to mount the jacks in the wall)?
  3. What helpful advice can you give (how big of a whole to drill in a wall faceplate, advice on selecting adapters or other needed hardware, comments on condition of equipment shown in images, etc.)?
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    $\begingroup$ Looks like PL-259/SO-239 to me; I'll leave it to someone else to provide a more comprehensive answer. $\endgroup$ – Amber Nov 27 '13 at 19:01
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, it looks awfully close to a UHF connector to me as well. Can you edit your post to include some numbers for its size? (Particularly plug inner diameter and socket center pin receptable diameter.) That might help in properly identifying the type. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Nov 27 '13 at 21:11
  • $\begingroup$ I can confirm it is indeed a UHF connector (PL-259/SO-239). Bought an adapter for it today ;) $\endgroup$ – Dan Nov 27 '13 at 23:29
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For Question 1:

  • As others have said, this does look like a PL-259/SO-239, commonly called a UHF Connector.

Question 2:

  • You can get wall mount adapters for these connections too, I'm not sure I can post links here, but search for "SO-239 wall plate". In the event you can't find this specific one, you could potentially use others, like the one in your photo on the right which looks to be a BNC connector. You can get UHF to BNC adapters fairly readily at most electronics stores.
  • As Phil Frost pointed out, check the rating on ALL connectors that you use, meet the requirements for the power you are going to run.

Question 3:

  • The wall plate you end up purchasing, should come with instructions for mounting, this will let you know how big a hole to cut. Definitely do not cut holes in your wall until you have selected the wall plate you want to place
  • Make sure you sketch out your implementation, as this will let you build a list of required components.
  • Make sure however you bring this cable in from the outside, it is very well weather proofed, cutting holes in exterior walls is easy, but you need to be careful you aren't destroying any moisture membranes or anything else in the process.
  • Be VERY careful when you make the hole to bring this into the house that you aren't drilling near any pipes or electrical wires, you can buy tools (or borrow as they can be expensive) to detect wires and pipes in walls before you start drilling.
  • I'm not sure how tall your antenna there is, but the usual safety precautions around harnesses for climbing and staying WELL clear of any overhead power lines apply.
  • You don't mention what your living situation is, but you should also check if you are allowed to erect an antenna like this, as often there are restrictions.
  • As Pete NU9W pointed out - One additional point about the entrance from the outside: when it leaves the wall on the outside the cable should initially go down, even if its destination is up. That forms a drip loop, which makes it harder for water to follow the cable into the wall.
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    $\begingroup$ Note that the BNC connector is probably not rated for the same power handling as the UHF connector. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Nov 28 '13 at 0:11
  • $\begingroup$ I've only got 5W so I should be fine ;) $\endgroup$ – Dan Nov 28 '13 at 1:43
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    $\begingroup$ @Dan in that case, maybe you just want to put BNC connectors on all your cables, because BNC have lower insertion loss, are actually usable at the modern definition of "UHF", and are easier to connect. Perhaps somewhat less rugged outdoors, but really, a much better, modern connector. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Nov 28 '13 at 3:31
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    $\begingroup$ @Dan Any physically decent size connector should handle 50 W easily, even into an unmatched load. SO-239 is common on amateur HF equipment at least in the 100 W range, even on sides intended for connecting to unmatched loads (such as the antenna side of an ATU). $\endgroup$ – a CVn Nov 28 '13 at 15:14
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    $\begingroup$ One additional point about the entrance from the outside: when it leaves the wall on the outside the cable should initially go down, even if its destination is up. That forms a drip loop, which makes it harder for water to follow the cable into the wall. $\endgroup$ – Pete NU9W Nov 29 '13 at 1:13

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