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Simple question, but for me is really important. "Can I use the APRS over TCPIP without a ham license in Europe Union (especially in Austria)?"
I consider yes, because I am not transmitting with radio, but I am not sure. And if yes, which call sign I can use?

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    $\begingroup$ Since this is a question about regulations, can you please edit your question to indicate the relevant jurisdiction? $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jan 17 '17 at 22:51
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    $\begingroup$ If you are not transmitting by radio, and if there is no chance of it being retransmitted by radio, then the part 97 rules about station identification do not apply. $\endgroup$ – SDsolar Jan 20 '17 at 19:40
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    $\begingroup$ @SDsolar Since he's not in the US, then no FCC rules apply, Part 97 or otherwise $\endgroup$ – Scott Earle Mar 8 '18 at 2:07
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I don't know Europe's regulations, but in the US under the FCC's jurisdiction, the onus is on the station operator to prevent unauthorized transmissions. An unlicensed individual using APRS on the internet wouldn't be violating any regulation, but the station operator who allows her station to make prohibited transmissions via the internet would be.

Likewise, the FCC does not regulate Winlink, AllStar, IRLP, or any other ham-on-internet activity. They regulate what's transmitted, and hold the station operator accountable.

So while using APRS on the internet without a license may not be illegal per se, it's not allowed by the amateurs who operate the APRS network.

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When you send something to APRS, even via Internet, it eventually may end up retransmitted on ham radio frequencies.

Thus, you are not allowed to use the system if you do not have valid amateur radio license.

APRS network requires you to identify using ham radio call sign which you have only if you have valid license.

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    $\begingroup$ At least in the US, the station operator is responsible for preventing unauthorized access. I don't think the FCC cares at all about what happens on the internet, so someone using APRS on TCP/IP isn't committing any crime, though the station operators may not like it. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jan 18 '17 at 15:12
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    $\begingroup$ On the other side, everybody can send a packet to APRS via TCPIP, also with arbitrary call sign, because for using internet protocols people doesnt need a license. $\endgroup$ – Bjørson Ålmer Jan 18 '17 at 16:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Phil Frost - W8II can you postit as an answer, than I can mark this question as resolved. $\endgroup$ – Bjørson Ålmer Jan 23 '17 at 20:35
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    $\begingroup$ @BjørsonÅlmer Done. Though you may want to wait for an answer specific to Europe or Austria: things could be different. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jan 24 '17 at 2:52
  • $\begingroup$ I did not say it is illegal but network requires licensed call sign to avoid issues. $\endgroup$ – Pedja YT9TP Apr 17 '18 at 15:21
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Contrary to other answers, there are ARPS networks out there that can be used without a Ham license. The key, as @PhilFrost points out, is that your original packet must not make it out to RF. The APRS-IS network is specifically focused on supporting an Internet backbone for APRS that might originate or be destined for RF and so requires a Ham license before sending any packets to it, but there are two other, compatible networks that specifically disallow RF transmission of their data, CWOP and FireNet. Both of them tend to be focused around collecting weather data, but will pass any APRS packets receive to other TCP/IP clients attached to the network. All traffic on APRS-IS is replicated on FireNet which also includes a lot of higher volume NWS messages/alerts.

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